2019 r1 horsepower

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2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 Review

YZF-R1 Motorcycle Test by Wayne Vickers


Given that the updated 2020 R1 has just been announced (link), Wayne thought it might be an opportune time to have a quick look at the current model before its relegated to the second hand only category. Take it away Wayne…


It only occurred to me as I picked up the keys that I’d never actually had the chance to throw a leg over an R1 before. I have covered well over 100,000 kilometres on my fireblades, both on road and track, and have spent time on all of the other Japanese manufacturers wares, along with most of the European options. But before Trev sorted this YZF-R1 for me I had never before had the chance to wring the neck of an R1.

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Not that I hadn’t wanted to mind you. The cross-plane crank engine had me at ‘hello’, and gets me all wobbly knee’d and excited in the nether regions. Truth is that I’ve been lusting after one since the first ’09 incarnation for the exhaust note alone, but as my own circumstances had moved me away from full bore sports bike ownership, I’d resisted the temptation to ride one… Probably a good thing for my wallet as it turns out.

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Initial impressions were, as expected – it’s quite compact, the riding position is suitably extreme, the suspension is stiffer than a Pfizer intern on date night and… holy cat snot this thing sure has some poke. It used to be a nonsense marketing phrase but modern sports bike really are race bikes with lights these days.

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As soon as I got it home I couldn’t help but start raving about the engine. My wife and kids heard about it. My mates heard about it. The coffee guy heard about it. My mates heard about it some more. It’s other-worldly. Smooth and impeccably fueled even off idle, the throttle feel is just superb. It’s low rev big-bang-burble, transforms into a gutteral mid-range growl with a healthy dose of angry air-box thrown in and then a top end howl. It’s a banshee.

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And it absolutely hammers. Jesus does it lay down some hump. From second gear on, as the electronics start to loosen the reins a little, its after-burner city. 200 big, energetic thoroughbreds. Big horses. And you feel every one of them. It’s mad. It’s ridiculous. It’s unnecessary. It’s addictive and I’m more than a bit smitten. Sounds proper horn too, even though the bike I rode was running the standard muffler it was epic! With a slip-on they frighten the four horsemen.

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‘That’ engine, combined with a near perfect quick shifting six-speed box completes the driveline, it’s a performance masterpiece. Clutchless upshifts are a doddle, but are slicker from the mid-range up and I still used the clutch on down shifts, as sometimes the lever felt a bit reluctant to drop down a cog. It is worth noting that the bike only had a bit over a thousand kilometres on it when I got it, so I’d imagine it would loosen up a little more with time. Either way it wasn’t an issue.

When on the charge the electronics are flattering (too many acronyms to list but rest assured there’s a shit ton of tech). Even on my first cold, dampish run down to Lorne I was quickly feeling confident and finding a rhythm, such is the seamless nature of the traction and slide control systems. They don’t get in the way at all. You can just roll on the gas confident in the knowledge that you have a safety net smarter than you… And smart they are.

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It comes with four engine modes, A-D. ‘A’ being the most powerful, stepping down to ‘D’ being the wet map. There’s little difference between A and B modes on the road until the top end ,where the B map feels a little (but not much) softer. I ended up using the B mode in the wet, it’s a pussy cat down low when you want it to be. Each map adjusts power, traction and slide control settings but unfortunately these aren’t able to be changed on the move, however you can tweak individual settings for power, traction and slide control. Which is a bit odd. Handy though, because the C map doesn’t have the Lift Control System (Yammies anti wheelie tech).. So you could give everything full welly without the fun police stopping the front coming up. Not that I would of course. Just sayin. For research purposes.

When activated, it’s very reluctant to lift the front in the first three cogs. It won’t come up unless seriously provoked, at which time its then gently brought back down to Earth. While it might be a bit of a buzz kill when you want to have a play, it is brutally effective when you’re in the twisties. The front is positively glued to the deck. No doubt helped by the aforementioned weight forward riding position. There is something to be said for having the front hover a few centimetres above the deck under full acceleration, the front dipping to kiss the tarmac as you as you snick through the lower gears. During those moments, and quite a few others to be fair, I felt like a riding god.

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While we’re banging on about electronics – the TFT dash is a bit on the small side for my liking, but it’s nice enough on the main. Couple of minor gripes from me, no distance to empty meter and some fairly pointless info being displayed in spots. I get that Yamaha wanted to show off some tech and added a brake activation force meter, a g force meter as well as an indicator for the quickshifter to tell you if you’re accelerating or braking.. but I’m not convinced that you’d want to be looking at the dash when getting really hard on the gas or the picks. And I definitely don’t need to be shown if I’m accelerating or decelerating.. Seems like some distraction waiting to happen.

Suspension on both ends is of course, firm. Really firm. Race bike firm. As is the seat. Sure the ride is stiff, but surprisingly it’s not actually overly harsh on big impacts as the suspension is well spec’d and damped, and has plenty of adjustment to fine tune things. It’s manageable on everyday roads and doable for a regular commute, but becomes an effort for me with my fairly extreme loop. The straight stretch from Geelong to Melbourne is not fun on something like this. But you endure it for the weekend’s play time.

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It is a trade off. The aggressive weight forward geometry comes at a price comfort wise at regular speeds and anything below two-thirds attack. It comes into its own and starts making sense as speeds and intent rise. And the faster and harder you go the better it feels. Mid corner it is mega – super planted and giving you the ability to run centimetre perfect, precise lines. And it’s impeccably light and easy to flick left to right and change direction. Phenomenal for a full litre bike.

Brakes are a match for the rest of the bike. Super strong with plenty of bite and feel – they neither feel wanting or overpowered. And you can’t feel the linked system working – it just does its thing. I didn’t even know they were linked until I re-read the specs. Noice.

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Sports bikes are a pretty extreme thing these days. They’re now at the point where they’re so focussed on outright performance, that they are arguably a little compromised as a road bike. It wasn’t always that way mind you. Up until about 15 years ago, sports bikes were still reasonably adaptable as all-rounders. But they’re getting seriously focussed now. I’d probably put my Osteo’s kids through Uni if I commuted on one full time. But it might nearly be worth it. I did the Deans Marsh – Lorne return run three-times in a row on it and it was Nirvana, I haven’t felt that connected to a sports bike for a while.. even if it was only 10 degrees and I wasn’t even remotely getting near the bikes limits.

Time to wrap it up.

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Is it a brilliant sports bike? Unquestionably. Utterly ridiculous levels of performance and a soundtrack to die for – even more so with a pipe. That engine is off the charts good. Suspension, handling and brakes are epic. Feels way more nimble than litre bikes of a generation ago. There’s no weak link really.

Is it a brilliant road bike? Well yes, and no. Like most of the current crop of focussed sports bikes it makes some serious comfort concessions for such high levels of performance. Performance that realistically is now well out of reach of most riders on the road. I’d need and love to have a few days at a dry track to fully appreciate its capabilities. Ultimately the assessment of whether those concessions are acceptable is your call to make, depending on your situation and requirements. If my commute was shorter I reckon I’d be making some phone calls to a Yamaha dealer, as those moments on a bike like this, up your favourite stretch of road, are something to truly behold.

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2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 in summary

Why I like it:

  • That engine is just astonishing, the sound is ridiculous
  • Terrific handling when getting up it. Feels like a lighter bike
  • There is no single weak point – it’s an all round package
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I’d like it more if:

  • Ride modes were switchable on the fly
  • I’d need a slip on for more sounds of the apocalypse
  • Can you make a version that’s a bit less extreme in terms of ride position..? Or build an MT10 Tracer version pls? I need some cross plane crank action in my life!

2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 Specifications

Specifications
Engine TypeLiquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC, 4-valve, forward-inclined parallel 4-cylinder
Displacement998 cc
Bore x Stroke79.0 x 50.9 mm
Compression Ratio13.0 : 1
Lubrication SystemWet sump
Fuel ManagementFuel Injection
Engine ManagementYCC-T, YCC-I, TCS, SCS, LIF, QSS, UBS, ABS, LCS
IgnitionTCI
Starter SystemElectric
Fuel Tank Capacity 17 L
Final TransmissionChain
TransmissionConstant mesh 6-speed
Frame TypeAluminium Deltabox
Suspension FrontTelescopic forks, 120 mm travel
Suspension RearSwingarm (link suspension), 120 mm travel
Brakes FrontHydraulic dual discs, 320 mm – ABS
Brakes RearHydraulic single disc, 220 mm – ABS
Tyres Front120/70 ZR17MC (58W) Tubeless
Tyres Rear190/55 ZR17M/C (75W) Tubeless
Length 2055 mm
Width 690 mm
Height1150 mm
Seat Height (mm)855 mm
Wheelbase 1405 mm
Ground Clearance130 mm
Wet Weight199 Kg
Price$26,399 Ride Away
Sours: https://www.mcnews.com.au/yamaha-yzf-r1-review-2019-r1-motorcycle-test/

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Design

  • Aerodynamic styling
  • All-LED lighting
  • Full-color TFT display

A windtunnel-tested skin on the YZF-R1 mostly contains all the goodies, but leaves a bit more of the engine visible than is typical of supersport-level machines. It’s built to offer minimal resistance to penetration, as any good racebike should, but the factory takes advantage of the ram-air effect and uses it to deliver a higher volumetric efficiency than is possible with a naturally aspirated engine.

Tiny LED headlights take care of business from their unobtrusive little niches at the top of the cowling scoop, and since the turn signals come integrated with the mirrors, they add no extra drag of their own. Plus, it’s really convenient if you want to strip the bike down to its race-weight for a track day.

A bubble canopy gives the TFT display a measure of protection as well as creates a minimal, race-style pocket that you really have to tuck into to get any protection, but the clip-on bars and jockey-mount pegs encourage that kind of posture anyway. In fact, if you plan on using this as a streetbike/commuter, you should be aware that this isn’t like a “standard” model that will let you push off for an almost-upright posture; you’re going to be almost locked into Superman mode at all times.

The 4.5-gallon aluminum fuel tank strikes a long flat flyline ahead of the steep tumble to the pilot’s seat, and it comes with the typical flared shape that leaves a handy knee-hanger to enable your body English. There’s a little bit of rise to the tapered tail for that nose-down/tail-up stance that looks so good, but it should come as no surprise that the pillion area isn’t quite as robust as the rest of the bike. It comes with a skinny p-pad that may prevent any bruised tailbones or naughty bits, but not much else. Oh well, you can’t have everything, and if you plan on having a regular passenger, I’d recommend a different machine; a very different machine.

At the terminus, the mudguard mounts the tag and rear turn signals so, like the mirrors and winkers up front, it provides an all-in-one assembly for quick raceday prep.

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Chassis

  • Deltabox® aluminum frame
  • High-spec, fully-adjustable suspension
  • Fully-adjustable KYB fork
  • Brake control with ABS

The R1 and the R1M start to diverge a bit in the support structure. Not in the bones itself — both run the stressed-engine Deltabox frame derived from the M1 project — but in the suspension components. The base R1 runs some nice gear to be sure, with inverted KYB stems that float the front end on 4.7 inches of travel and provide the full spectrum of adjustments. Out back, a KYB monoshock springs off the long, boomerang-shaped swingarm with the same travel figure and adjustments plus a spring-preload feature because, well, because people expect it no matter what kind of bike it is.

Yeah, all that is great and fine, but the R1M takes it to another level entirely with the Öhlins Electronic Racing Suspension system that receives data about vehicle motion and attitude to automatically adjust the dampers for a dynamic riding experience. The factory added two new settings for track tackling performance with a road-friendly response curve and three rider-programmable profiles that allow you to dial it in for yourself.

Stupidfast bikes need crazy-strong brakes, and the factory obliges with dual 320 mm discs up front and a 220 mm disc out back. As with the suspension, the brakes benefit from the 3D, six-axis inertial measurement unit that feeds data to the ABS. It allows for the fact that the braking effort shares the same finite amount of traction and prevents you from pulling a lowsider from overbraking in a curve.

On top of that, Yamaha’s own Unified Brake System shares a portion of the pressure from the front brake circuit with the rear caliper to help increase stability under heavy front brake use. That’s right, go ahead and trail-brake with abandon, the R1 has your back.

Super-light, 17-inch magnesium wheels round out the rolling chassis with even more racing tech, and they’re lined with a ZR-rated 120/70 up front and 190/55 out back.

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Drivetrain

  • MotoGP®-derived 998 cc Crossplane Crankshaft engine
  • Lean-angle-sensitive traction control
  • MotoGP®-developed slide control
  • Lift control and Launch control
  • Up/down quick shifter

Now for the star of the show, the beating heart of the YZF-R1 that makes all the magic happen, Yamaha’s Crossplane Crankshaft engine. The beating heart runs in an inline-four configuration with race-proven tech borrowed, once again, from the “Mission One” program. Super-light titanium conrods have fracture-split big ends that are supposed to deliver superior fitment, but there’s no doubt that the lowered reciprocating mass helps the engine spool up quickly in response to demand at the right grip. Of course, that demand washes through a number of electronic safety systems before it gets to the engine.

The Quick Shift System was updated to allow for seamless, push-button shifting both up and down the range, as did the Wheel Lift Control so it will generate more drive while trying to keep the front wheel on the ground. Power modes, Launch Control, Traction Control, and Slide Control add to the fandanglery to help you manage all that power, and most of us will need as much help as we can get since the mill churns out a staggering 200 horsepower and 82.9 pound-feet of torque. Yeah, it’s like that, and it can drive the R1 at speeds up to 186 mph. Huh, not with me on it.

The 70 mm bore and 50.9 mm stroke adds up to 998 cc with a 13-to-1 compression ratio that adds up to premium fuel, no way around that, but thems (sic) the breaks if you want to play with the big boys. A slipper clutch adds another layer of traction-patch protection with a six-speed gearbox to crunch the ratios and send power to the rear wheel via O-ring chain drive.

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Pricing

You can score a 2021 YZF-R1 in Raven or Team Yamaha Blue for $17,399 MSRP. The R1M is significantly pricier at $26,099 MSRP, but the envy it generates comes standard with the package.

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Competitors

The BMW S 1000 RR is currently one of my favorite Euro-tastic literbikes, and I think it makes a dandy competitor for the R1, so here we go.

BMW S 1000 RR

Beemer’s body panels are equally aerodynamic though they do leave a little more to the imagination as they cover more of the engine. An asymmetrical headlight arrangement gives the BMW a distinctive mug head-on, and the fuel tank hump is bit more dramatic, but bike design at this level is driven entirely by performance so aesthetics are merely a vanity here.

At the stems, there is little to choose between the two as they both rock automatically adjustable suspension systems with data from an on-board gyroscope that also feeds the ABS for corner-braking protection across the board. Yamaha alone offers a UBS feature, though I question the necessity. Riders at this level should be able to balance their own brakes by feel and muscle memory. If you can’t, you need to get good on something a little tamer.

BMW tops the displacement chart by a single cube for a 999 cc displacement. Inline four-bangers drive both bikes with similar drivetrains and electronic gadgetry, and naturally, come with similar performance profiles. Beemer claims a total of 199 horsepower and 83 pounds of gruntversus 200/82.9 from the R1. If you’re looking for a silver bullet, you won’t find it here, and any advantage one may have over the other will evaporate in the face of a superior rider skillset.

It’s a game of inches at the checkout with the $17,399 sticker on the stock R1 against the $16,995 tag on the S 1000 RR. You’ll have to use another metric to decide who wins in your book.

See our review of the BMW S 1000 RR.

He Said

“Ya know, frequently the price tag on these street/race machines acts as a firewall to keep the plebes safe by keeping the bike out of reach. The R1 doesn’t enjoy that filter, but I’m tellin’ ya now, you’d better know what you’re about if you fancy one of the models from this family.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “It’s a stupidfast bike, that’s for sure. If you’ve ever had the chance to sit on an R6, sitting on the R1 feels just like that. It’s very smooth, very aggressive, and very wide. Unless you’re fairly tall, it’ll be a challenge to get your feet down so there’s more to the seat height here than just a number in the spec list. This bike wants to go fast, and I feel like unless you know what you’re doing and have the skillset to handle it, you can really get yourself into trouble in a hurry.”

Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M Specifications

Further Reading

Yamaha

Read more Yamaha news.

TJ Hinton

- [email protected]

T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read full bio

About the author
Sours: https://www.topspeed.com/motorcycles/motorcycle-reviews/yamaha/2018-2021-yamaha-yzf-r1-r1m-ar182006.html
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Yamaha YZF-1000 R1

Make Model

Yamaha YZF 1000 R1

Year

2019

Engine

Four stroke, transverse four cylinder, DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder.

Capacity

998 cc / 60.9 cu-in
Bore x Stroke
Compression Ratio
Cooling SystemLiquid cooled
LubricationWet sump
Engine ManagementYCC-T, YCC-I, PWR, TCS, LCS, LIF, SCS, QSS, CCU & SCU

Induction

Fuel Injection with YCC-T and YCC-I

Ignition 

TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
StartingElectric

Max Power

147.1 kW / 200.0 PS @ 13500 rpm

Max Torque

112.4 Nm / 11.5 kg-m  @ 11500 rpm
ClutchWet, Multiple Disc

Transmission 

6-speed w/multiplate slipper clutch
Final Drive"O" ring chain

Front Suspension

43mm KYB® inverted fork; fully adjustable
Front Wheel Travel120 mm  /  4.7 in

Rear Suspension

KYB® Single shock w/piggyback reservoir, 4-way adjustable
Rear Wheel Travel120 mm  /  4.7 in

Front Brakes

2x 320mm discs 4 piston calipers, UBS ABS

Rear Brakes

Single 220mm disc 1 piston caliper, UBS ABS

Front Tyre

Rear Tyre

DimensionsLength 2054.8 mm / 80.9 in
Width 690 mm / 27.2 in
Height 1150 mm / 45.3 in
Wheelbase1419 mm / 55.9 in
Ground Clearance135mm /  5.3 in
Seat Height830 mm / 32.7 in

Wet Weight

199 kg / 439 lbs

Fuel Capacity 

17 Liters / 4.5 US gal

MotoGP, the highest form of motorcycle racing, is our proving ground. The technology Yamaha has pioneered and proven on MotoGP circuits around the world can now be enjoyed by racers and riders alike. The R1 provides riders with a taste of what it would be like to ride the championship winning Yamaha M1. A showcase of Yamaha’s technology leadership, the R1 raises the bar with its uncompromised performance and handling.

Power

By reducing frictional losses, using high tech, lightweight components and optimizing intake efficiency the R1 engine offers significant power and torque. And with a comprehensive list of electronic control technologies, the light, compact R1 is easier to control than ever.

Technology

The R1 is Yamaha’s technology flagship. From titanium rods to magnesium wheels to a whole host of electronic “Yamaha Ride Controls”, the R1 exemplifies Yamaha’s leadership role in motorcycle development and highlights our innovation, quality and attention to detail.

2019 YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M

Bred from Yamaha’s YZR-M1 MotoGP® racing heritage, the 2019 YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M continue to offer riders the ultimate exhilaration of maximum performance combined with the confidence of control.

Powered by a 998cc high-output crossplane-crankshaft engine tied to a full suite of inter-related electronics technologies, both the YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M feature clutchless “auto-blip” downshift technology as part of the standard Quick Shift System (QSS).  To help achieve the most effective power delivery, a proprietary six-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) performs at a rate of 125 calculations per second, providing information to a multitude of control systems designed to inspire rider confidence across ever-changing road conditions.

The 2019 YZF-R1M also features Öhlins Electronic Racing Suspension (ERS), which can be fine-tuned through the “YRC Setting” smartphone or tablet app connected to the motorcycle’s Communication Control Unit (CCU).

Engine

  • Cutting-Edge Crossplane Engine
    The 998cc inline 4-cylinder, crossplane crankshaft engine features titanium fracture-split connecting rods, which are an industry first for a production motorcycle. The titanium alloy used to manufacture the connecting rods is around 60% lighter than steel, and this reduction in weight gives the R1 engine a responsive and potent character at high rpm. This stunning engine delivers extremely high horsepower and a strong pulse of linear torque.
  • Compact Stacked Transmission
    A 6-speed transmission features close-ratio gearing to best match the high-revving engine. The transmission also “stacks” the input/output shafts to centralize mass and to keep the overall engine size shorter front-to-back, which optimizes engine placement in the frame for outstanding weight balance.
  • Rocker-Arm Valvetrain
    Advanced rocker-arm valve actuation uses the arm’s lever ratio to allow for larger valve lift while using lower cam lobes and reduced spring pressure, further boosting power.
  • Lightweight Engine Components
    Lightweight magnesium covers and ultra-light aluminum fasteners are used across the engine to further reduce weight.
  • Titanium Exhaust System
    The R1 is equipped with an exhaust system manufactured primarily from lightweight titanium. The compact midship muffler also centralizes mass low in the frame and as close to the center of the machine as possible, improving overall handling.
  • Advanced Clutch
    Yamaha’s assist and slipper clutch is used to give the rider more confident downshifts when entering corners aggressively, while still smoothly handling the torque of the R1’s high-output inline-four motor.

Electronics

  • MotoGP®-Level Controllability
    Yamaha’s Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) uses six axes of measurement: a gyro sensor that measures pitch, roll, and yaw, and an accelerometer that measures acceleration in the fore-aft, up-down, and right-left directions… all at a rate of 125 calculations per second. The IMU communicates with the ECU, which activates the technologies in Yamaha Ride Control (YRC): Power Mode, Traction Control System, Slide Control System, Launch Control System, Lift Control System and Quick Shift System with rev-matching. All these systems are adjustable and can be saved within four presets in the YRC system.
  • Ride-by-Wire Fueling
    The ride-by-wire Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T®) system senses the slightest throttle input by the rider and instantaneously calculates the ideal throttle valve opening, and then actuates the throttle valves to actively control intake volume. The R1 also features YCC-I® (Yamaha Chip Controlled Intake), a variable intake system that broadens the spread of power in across the entire rpm range.
  • PWR Mode
    Power Delivery Mode (PWR) lets the rider choose from four settings of throttle-valve response to best match their preferences and riding conditions, adjusting both engine response and overall power.
  • Lean Angle Sensitive TCS
    The R1’s Traction Control System (TCS) reduces rear wheel spin when exiting corners, calculating differences in wheels speeds and in relation to lean angle. As lean angle increases, so does the amount of intervention, with ten separate settings (off and 1-9) enabling the rider to dial in the exact level of control needed.
  • MotoGP ®-Developed SCS
    Yamaha’s Slide Control System (SCS) is the first of its kind on a production motorcycle and comes directly from the YZR-M1® MotoGP® bike. It works in tandem with the IMU, so that if a slide is detected while accelerating during hard leaning conditions, the ECU will step in and control engine power to reduce the slide. This too can be adjusted by the rider, with four settings (1-3 and off).
  • Life Control System
    The R1’s Lift Control System (LIF) features progressive mapping to improve forward drive when the system intervenes. As before, the IMU detects the rate of chassis pitch and the ECU controls engine power to reduce the front wheel lift during acceleration, with four settings (1-3 and off) for fine-tuning.

  • Race Start Control
    The R1’s Launch Control System (LCS) limits engine rpms to 10,000 even with wide open throttle. It maintains optimum engine output in conjunction with input from the TCS and LIF systems to maximize acceleration from a standing start. Three setting levels regulate the effect (1-2 and off).
  • Up and Down Quick Shift System
    The Quick Shift System (QSS) on the YZF-R1 features downshifting capability as well as allowing full-throttle clutchless upshifting. On downshifts, the ECU matches engine speed on each downshift for instantaneous gear changes with minimal chassis disruption. The QSS can be adjusted with three settings (1-2 and off), as well as turning the downshift function on and off.
  • Full Color Instruments
    The R1 features a brilliant full-color, thin-film transistor (TFT) meter, including front brake pressure and fore/aft G-force readouts, giving the rider even more feedback from the machine. It features both street mode and a track mode that focuses on performance information, such as YRC settings, a zoomed-in view of the tachometer in the upper rpm range, a lap timer with best lap and last lap feature, gear position indicator and speed.

SUSPENSION

  • Deltabox® Frame
    The slim aluminum Deltabox® frame and magnesium subframe contribute to a light weight and compact chassis design, with overall geometry refined on racetracks around the world. The rigid motor mounts use the engine as a stressed member of the frame for optimal rigidity balance and great cornering performance on the race track.
  • Fully Adjustable KYB® Fork
    The R1 features an advanced inverted KYB® front fork with 43mm inner tubes and a 4.7 inch stroke with full adjustability, for incredible front-end feel on the track. All adjustments are also made on the top of the fork legs, for simplified tuning.
  • Linkage-Type KYB® Shock
    The fully adjustable KYB® shock has a rear bottom link pivot position that is optimally placed to provide exceptional handling, and excellent transmission of engine torque to the track surface.

  • Aluminum Fuel Tank
    An aluminum 4.5 gallon fuel tank, weighing in at a full 3.5 pounds less than a comparable steel tank, further reduces overall weight and is sculpted to give riders a good lower body connection to the machine.
  • Powerful, Controllable Brakes
    The track developed racing ABS and Unified Braking System provide maximum braking performance. UBS inhibits unwanted rear-end motion during braking by activating the rear brake when the front brake is applied, with force distribution based on the bike’s attitude and lean angle. 4-piston radial mounted front calipers ride on big 320mm rotors for excellent stopping power.
  • Race-Ready Magnesium Wheels
    10-spoke cast magnesium wheels significantly lower rotational mass compared to conventional aluminum alloy rims, reducing unsprung weight for quick direction changes and responsive handling.

Additional Features

  • MotoGP® Styling
    Dynamic YZR-M1 styling creates a more compact profile with improved aerodynamics, getting you closer to MotoGP® than any other production motorcycle available today.
  • All-LED Lighting
    LED headlights are both lightweight and compact, allowing for a more streamlined design of the front face. LED front turn signals are integrated into the mirrors for improved aerodynamics, while an LED tail light is stylish and highly visible.
  • Factory Level Telemetry
    Available as an option is the Yamaha-exclusive Communication Control Unit. The CCU allows riders to communicate with the vehicle via Wi-Fi through Yamaha’s exclusive Y-TRAC smartphone and tablet app. The system is comprised of the CCU and GPS antenna, running data can be recorded via a data logger, with course mapping and automatic lap timing managed by GPS. This data can then be wirelessly downloaded to the Android® or Apple® iOS® app where it can be analyzed. Changes to settings can be made via the Yamaha Ride Control (YRC) Setting app and then uploaded back to the R1.

 

 

 

 

 

Sours: https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/yamaha/yamaha_r1_19.html

TECHNICAL LEADERSHIP ON 2 WHEELS.

2019 Yamaha YZF-R1

2019 Yamaha YZF-R12019 Yamaha YZF-R12019 Yamaha YZF-R12019 Yamaha YZF-R12019 Yamaha YZF-R1

2019 Yamaha YZF-R1:

Packed with MotoGP technology, crossplane concept engine, advanced Rider Active electronics and so much more.

MotoGP, the highest form of motorcycle racing, is our proving ground. The technology Yamaha has pioneered and proven on MotoGP circuits around the world can now be enjoyed by racers and riders alike. The R1 provides riders with a taste of what it would be like to ride the championship winning Yamaha M1. A showcase of Yamaha’s technology leadership, the R1 raises the bar with its uncompromised performance and handling.

///Power

By reducing frictional losses, using high tech, lightweight components and optimizing intake efficiency the R1 engine offers significant power and torque. And with a comprehensive list of electronic control technologies, the light, compact R1 is easier to control than ever.

///Technology

The R1 is Yamaha’s technology flagship. From titanium rods to magnesium wheels to a whole host of electronic “Yamaha Ride Controls”, the R1 exemplifies Yamaha’s leadership role in motorcycle development and highlights our innovation, quality and attention to detail.

2019 YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M

Bred from Yamaha’s YZR-M1 MotoGP® racing heritage, the 2019 YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M continue to offer riders the ultimate exhilaration of maximum performance combined with the confidence of control.

Powered by a 998cc high-output crossplane-crankshaft engine tied to a full suite of inter-related electronics technologies, both the YZF-R1 and YZF-R1M feature clutchless “auto-blip” downshift technology as part of the standard Quick Shift System (QSS).  To help achieve the most effective power delivery, a proprietary six-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) performs at a rate of 125 calculations per second, providing information to a multitude of control systems designed to inspire rider confidence across ever-changing road conditions.

The 2019 YZF-R1M also features Öhlins Electronic Racing Suspension (ERS), which can be fine-tuned through the “YRC Setting” smartphone or tablet app connected to the motorcycle’s Communication Control Unit (CCU).

2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 Totalmotorcycle.com Key Features
  • MotoGP®-Derived Crossplane Crankshaft Superbike
    The YZF-R1® features a lightweight and compact crossplane crankshaft, inline-four-cylinder, 998cc high output engine. Featuring titanium fracture-split connecting rods, an offset cylinder block and magnesium covers, the motor delivers extremely high horsepower and a strong pulse of linear torque for outstanding performance, all wrapped in aerodynamic MotoGP®-style bodywork.
  • Class-Leading Electronics Package
    The YZF-R1 features the most advanced electronics package ever offered on a supersport machine, with a full suite of interrelated technologies that enable the rider to enjoy the fullest range of performance with greater comfort, control, and ease of operation than ever before.
  • MotoGP®-Level Controllability
    The YZF-R1 pioneered the use of the first six-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) ever offered on a street-going motorcycle. The IMU consists of a gyro sensor that measures pitch, roll, and yaw, as well as an accelerometer that measures acceleration in the fore-aft, up- down, and right-left directions… all at a rate of 125 calculations per second. By calculating each signal, the IMU finds the precise vehicle position and movement, and communicates it to the ECU, enabling it to control the bike’s systems.
  • Digital Rider Aids
    The YZF-R1 is fully equipped with banking-sensitive Traction Control and unified ABS, as well as Slide Control, Launch Control, and more. The Quick Shift System provides both up and downshifting ability, automatically matching engine speed on downshifts for rapid clutchless shifts in either direction. The Wheel Lift Control system smoothly intervenes for maximum forward drive.
  • Deltabox® Chassis
    Advanced aluminum Deltabox® frame uses the engine as a stressed member of the chassis and is designed to provide optimum longitudinal, lateral and torsional rigidity balance. Fully adjustable suspension front and rear provides exceptional road-holding and tuneability.
2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 Totalmotorcycle.com Features and Benefits

Engine

  • Cutting-Edge Crossplane Engine
    The 998cc inline 4-cylinder, crossplane crankshaft engine features titanium fracture-split connecting rods, which are an industry first for a production motorcycle. The titanium alloy used to manufacture the connecting rods is around 60% lighter than steel, and this reduction in weight gives the R1 engine a responsive and potent character at high rpm. This stunning engine delivers extremely high horsepower and a strong pulse of linear torque.
  • Compact Stacked Transmission
    A 6-speed transmission features close-ratio gearing to best match the high-revving engine. The transmission also “stacks” the input/output shafts to centralize mass and to keep the overall engine size shorter front-to-back, which optimizes engine placement in the frame for outstanding weight balance.
  • Rocker-Arm Valvetrain
    Advanced rocker-arm valve actuation uses the arm’s lever ratio to allow for larger valve lift while using lower cam lobes and reduced spring pressure, further boosting power.
  • Lightweight Engine Components
    Lightweight magnesium covers and ultra-light aluminum fasteners are used across the engine to further reduce weight.
  • Titanium Exhaust System
    The R1 is equipped with an exhaust system manufactured primarily from lightweight titanium. The compact midship muffler also centralizes mass low in the frame and as close to the center of the machine as possible, improving overall handling.
  • Advanced Clutch
    Yamaha’s assist and slipper clutch is used to give the rider more confident downshifts when entering corners aggressively, while still smoothly handling the torque of the R1’s high-output inline-four motor.

Electronics

  • MotoGP®-Level Controllability
    Yamaha’s Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) uses six axes of measurement: a gyro sensor that measures pitch, roll, and yaw, and an accelerometer that measures acceleration in the fore-aft, up-down, and right-left directions… all at a rate of 125 calculations per second. The IMU communicates with the ECU, which activates the technologies in Yamaha Ride Control (YRC): Power Mode, Traction Control System, Slide Control System, Launch Control System, Lift Control System and Quick Shift System with rev-matching. All these systems are adjustable and can be saved within four presets in the YRC system.
  • Ride-by-Wire Fueling
    The ride-by-wire Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T®) system senses the slightest throttle input by the rider and instantaneously calculates the ideal throttle valve opening, and then actuates the throttle valves to actively control intake volume. The R1 also features YCC-I® (Yamaha Chip Controlled Intake), a variable intake system that broadens the spread of power in across the entire rpm range.
  • PWR Mode
    Power Delivery Mode (PWR) lets the rider choose from four settings of throttle-valve response to best match their preferences and riding conditions, adjusting both engine response and overall power.
  • Lean Angle Sensitive TCS
    The R1’s Traction Control System (TCS) reduces rear wheel spin when exiting corners, calculating differences in wheels speeds and in relation to lean angle. As lean angle increases, so does the amount of intervention, with ten separate settings (off and 1-9) enabling the rider to dial in the exact level of control needed.
  • MotoGP ®-Developed SCS
    Yamaha’s Slide Control System (SCS) is the first of its kind on a production motorcycle and comes directly from the YZR-M1® MotoGP® bike. It works in tandem with the IMU, so that if a slide is detected while accelerating during hard leaning conditions, the ECU will step in and control engine power to reduce the slide. This too can be adjusted by the rider, with four settings (1-3 and off).
  • Life Control System
    The R1’s Lift Control System (LIF) features progressive mapping to improve forward drive when the system intervenes. As before, the IMU detects the rate of chassis pitch and the ECU controls engine power to reduce the front wheel lift during acceleration, with four settings (1-3 and off) for fine-tuning.
  • Race Start Control
    The R1’s Launch Control System (LCS) limits engine rpms to 10,000 even with wide open throttle. It maintains optimum engine output in conjunction with input from the TCS and LIF systems to maximize acceleration from a standing start. Three setting levels regulate the effect (1-2 and off).
  • Up and Down Quick Shift System
    The Quick Shift System (QSS) on the YZF-R1 features downshifting capability as well as allowing full-throttle clutchless upshifting. On downshifts, the ECU matches engine speed on each downshift for instantaneous gear changes with minimal chassis disruption. The QSS can be adjusted with three settings (1-2 and off), as well as turning the downshift function on and off.
  • Full Color Instruments
    The R1 features a brilliant full-color, thin-film transistor (TFT) meter, including front brake pressure and fore/aft G-force readouts, giving the rider even more feedback from the machine. It features both street mode and a track mode that focuses on performance information, such as YRC settings, a zoomed-in view of the tachometer in the upper rpm range, a lap timer with best lap and last lap feature, gear position indicator and speed.

Chassis/Suspension

  • Deltabox® Frame
    The slim aluminum Deltabox® frame and magnesium subframe contribute to a light weight and compact chassis design, with overall geometry refined on racetracks around the world. The rigid motor mounts use the engine as a stressed member of the frame for optimal rigidity balance and great cornering performance on the race track.
  • Fully Adjustable KYB® Fork
    The R1 features an advanced inverted KYB® front fork with 43mm inner tubes and a 4.7 inch stroke with full adjustability, for incredible front-end feel on the track. All adjustments are also made on the top of the fork legs, for simplified tuning.
  • Linkage-Type KYB® Shock
    The fully adjustable KYB® shock has a rear bottom link pivot position that is optimally placed to provide exceptional handling, and excellent transmission of engine torque to the track surface.
  • Aluminum Fuel Tank
    An aluminum 4.5 gallon fuel tank, weighing in at a full 3.5 pounds less than a comparable steel tank, further reduces overall weight and is sculpted to give riders a good lower body connection to the machine.
  • Powerful, Controllable Brakes
    The track developed racing ABS and Unified Braking System provide maximum braking performance. UBS inhibits unwanted rear-end motion during braking by activating the rear brake when the front brake is applied, with force distribution based on the bike’s attitude and lean angle. 4-piston radial mounted front calipers ride on big 320mm rotors for excellent stopping power.
  • Race-Ready Magnesium Wheels
    10-spoke cast magnesium wheels significantly lower rotational mass compared to conventional aluminum alloy rims, reducing unsprung weight for quick direction changes and responsive handling.

Additional Features

  • MotoGP® Styling
    Dynamic YZR-M1 styling creates a more compact profile with improved aerodynamics, getting you closer to MotoGP® than any other production motorcycle available today.
  • All-LED Lighting
    LED headlights are both lightweight and compact, allowing for a more streamlined design of the front face. LED front turn signals are integrated into the mirrors for improved aerodynamics, while an LED tail light is stylish and highly visible.
  • Factory Level Telemetry
    Available as an option is the Yamaha-exclusive Communication Control Unit. The CCU allows riders to communicate with the vehicle via Wi-Fi through Yamaha’s exclusive Y-TRAC smartphone and tablet app. The system is comprised of the CCU and GPS antenna, running data can be recorded via a data logger, with course mapping and automatic lap timing managed by GPS. This data can then be wirelessly downloaded to the Android® or Apple® iOS® app where it can be analyzed. Changes to settings can be made via the Yamaha Ride Control (YRC) Setting app and then uploaded back to the R1.
2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 – Totalmotorcycle.com USA Specifications/Technical Details
US MSRP Price: $16699 USD
Canada MSRP Price: $20999 CDN
Europe/UK MSRP Price: £ See dealer for pricing in GBP (On The Road inc 20% Vat)
Australia MSRP Price: See dealer for pricing in AU

Engine Type 998cc, liquid-cooled inline 4 cylinder DOHC; 16 valves

Bore x Stroke 79.0mm x 50.9mm

Compression Ratio 13.0:1

Fuel Delivery Fuel injection with YCC-T and YCC-I

Transmission 6-speed; wet multiplate assist and slipper clutch

Final Drive Chain

Suspension / Front 43mm KYB® inverted fork; fully adjustable; 4.7-in travel

Suspension / Rear 43mm KYB® inverted fork; fully adjustable; 4.7-in travel

Brakes / Front Dual 320mm hydraulic disc; Unified Brake System and ABS

Brakes / Rear 220mm disc; Unified Brake System and ABS

Tires / Front 120/70ZR17

Tires / Rear 190/55ZR17

L x W x H 80.9 in x 27.2 in x 45.3 in

Seat Height 33.7 in

Wheelbase 55.3 in

Rake (Caster Angle) 24.0°

Trail 4.0 in

Maximum Ground

Clearance 5.1 in

Fuel Capacity 4.5 gal

Fuel Economy** 34 mpg

Wet Weight*** 441 lb

Warranty 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)

Color Team Yamaha Blue; Rapid Red

*** Wet weight includes the vehicle with all standard equipment and all fluids, including oil, coolant (as
applicable) and a full tank of fuel. It does not include the weight of options or accessories. Wet weight is
useful in making real-world comparisons with other models.

2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 – Totalmotorcycle.com Canada Specifications/Technical Details
Engine
Liquid-cooled, DOHC, 16-valves (4-valves / cyl), in-line four
Displacement
998cc
Bore and Stroke
79 x 50.9mm
Compression Ratio
13:1
Maximum Torque
11.5 kg-m (83.2 ft-lbs.) @ 11,500 rpm
Engine Management
YCC-T, YCC-I, PWR, TCS, LCS, LIF, SCS, QSS
Fuel Delivery
Mikuni 45mm throttle body FI with twin injectors (primary & secondary)
Estimated Fuel Consumption±
14.4kpl / 40.6mpg (Imp.)
Lubrication
Wet sump
Ignition / Starting
TCI / Electric
Transmission
6-speed
Final Drive
520 series “O” ring chain
Chassis
Suspension (Front)
Fully adj. 43mm inverted fork / 120 mm (4.7″) wheel travel
Suspension (Rear)
Fully adj. bottom link Monocross / 120mm (4.7″) wheel travel
Brakes (Front)
Dual 320mm discs / radial mount, 4-piston calipers / ABS equipped & unified
Brakes (Rear)
220mm disc / single piston caliper / ABS equipped & unified
Tires (Front)
120/70ZR17
Tires (Rear)
190/55ZR17
Critical Data
Length
2,055 mm (80.9″)
Width
690 mm (27.2″)
Height
1,150 mm (45.3″)
Wheelbase
1,405mm (55.3″)
Rake / Trail
24° / 102mm
Ground Clearance
130 mm (5.1″)
Seat Height
855 mm (33.7″)
Fuel Capacity
17 litres (3.7 Imp. gal.)
Wet Weight
200 kg (441 lb.)
Colour(s)
Yamaha Racing Blue
Vivid Red
2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 – Totalmotorcycle.com European Specifications/Technical Details
2019 Yamaha YZF-R1 – Totalmotorcycle.com Australian Specifications/Technical Details

TBA

Manufacturer Specifications and appearance are subject to change without prior notice on Total Motorcycle (TMW).

Sours: https://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcycles/2019/2019-yamaha-yzf-r1

Horsepower 2019 r1

Maxabout News

Yamaha YZF-R1 vs BMW S1000RR (2019): Yamaha R1 is the closest possible rival to the upcoming BMW S1000RR (2019). The motorcycle with 1:1 ratio for power to weight, R1 comes with the most advanced electronic feature list among other litre-class Japanese bikes. The 998cc, four-cylinder engine is good for 200 HP and 112.4 Nm of torque. The engine on S1000RR is 999cc, producing 207 HP and 113 Nm of torque. The output comes at same rpm value for the power and different values for the torque.

Yamaha YZF-R1

BMW proves to be better as the increase of 7 HP and low weight (3kg) results in better overall results. Yamaha R1 comes with a price of INR 19.67 lakh, clearly getting a much bigger tag in comparison to the Kawasaki ZX-10R (INR 14.30 lakh, ex-showroom). BMW S1000RR now features twin headlight with a symmetrical design, lighter fairing, and better aerodynamic ability while R1 features practical headlights and impressive suspension.

BMW S1000RR (2019)

Yamaha YZF-R1 vs BMW S1000RR

Engine & Performance

YZF-R1

  • Displacement: 998cc
  • Max Power: 200 HP @ 13,500 rpm
  • Max Torque: 112.4 NM @ 11,500 rpm
  • No. of Cylinders: 4
  • Gearbox: 6-Speed
  • Riding Modes, Power Modes
  • Cooling: Liquid-Cooled
  • Fuel Supply: Fuel Injection
  • Top Speed: 300 kph
  • Mileage: 14.74 kmpl (Certified)

2019 S1000RR

  • Displacement: 999cc
  • Max Power: 207 HP @ 13,500 rpm
  • Max Torque: 113 NM @ 11,000 rpm
  • No. of Cylinders: 4
  • Gearbox: 6-Speed
  • Riding Modes: Rain, Road, Dynamic, Race
  • Cooling: Liquid-Cooled
  • Fuel Supply: Fuel Injection
  • Top Speed: 300 kph
  • Mileage: 15.62 kmpl (Certified)

Brakes & Suspension

Yamaha YZF-R1 vs BMW S1000RR

YZF-R1

  • Front Brake: Dual 320mm Discs
  • Rear Brake: 220mm Single Disc
  • Cornering ABS
  • Front Suspension: Adjustable USD Telescopic Forks
  • Rear Suspension: Adjustable Monoshock

2019 S1000RR

  • Front Brake: Dual 320mm Discs
  • Rear Brake: 220mm Single Disc
  • BMW Motorrad Race ABS
  • Front Suspension: Adjustable USD Telescopic Forks
  • Rear Suspension: Adjustable Monoshock
2019 BMW S1000RR
Yamaha YZF-R1

Tyres & Frame

YZF-R1

  • Front Tyre: 120/70-ZR17
  • Rear Tyre: 190/55-ZR17
  • Frame: Diamond

2019 S1000RR

  • Front Tyre: 120/70-ZR17
  • Rear Tyre: 190/55-ZR17
  • Frame: Cast Aluminum

Dimensions & Weight

Yamaha YZF-R1 vs BMW S1000RR

YZF-R1

  • Overall Length: 2055mm
  • Overall Width: 690mm
  • Overall Height: 1150mm
  • Wheelbase: 1405mm
  • Seat Height: 855mm
  • Kerb Weight: 200 kg
  • Tank Capacity: 17-liters
  • Ground Clearance: 130mm

2019 S1000RR

  • Overall Length: 2073mm
  • Overall Width: 848mm (Including Mirrors)
  • Overall Height: 1151mm
  • Wheelbase: 1441mm
  • Seat Height: 824mm
  • Kerb Weight: 197 kg
  • Tank Capacity: 16.5-litres
  • Ground Clearance: 130mm (Approx.)

Ex-Showroom Price

  • Yamaha YZF-R1: INR 19.67 lakh
  • New BMW S1000RR: INR 20 lakh (approximate, launch in 2019)
2019 BMW S1000RR
Yamaha YZF-R1
Sours: https://news.maxabout.com/bike-comparisons/yamaha-yzf-r1-vs-bmw-s1000rr-2019/
2020 Yamaha R1M / R1 / R6 / R3 - Specs \u0026 Features EXPLAINED

Yamaha YZF-R1 Specs




Motorcycles Specs > Yamaha > Yamaha YZF-R1


(2019)

Yamaha YZF-R1 imageOnly images from Creative Commons allowed. Ultimate Specs does not claim ownership of user submitted images.

The Yamaha YZF-R1 model is a Sport bike manufactured by Yamaha . In this version sold from year 2019 , the dry weight is  and it is equipped with a In-line four, four-stroke motor. The engine produces a maximum peak output power of 200.00 HP (146.0 kW)) @ 13500 RPM and a maximum torque of 112.40 Nm (11.5 kgf-m or 82.9 ft.lbs) @ 11500 RPM . With this drive-train, the Yamaha YZF-R1 is capable of reaching a maximum top speed of  . On the topic of chassis characteristics, responsible for road holding, handling behavior and ride comfort, the Yamaha YZF-R1 has a Aluminum Deltabox frame with front suspension being 43mm KYB® inverted fork; fully adjustable and at the rear, it is equipped with KYB® piggyback shock, 4-way adjustable . Stock tire sizes are 120/70-ZR17 on the front, and 190/55-ZR17 on the rear. As for stopping power, the Yamaha YZF-R1 braking system includes Double disc. ABS. Hydraulic. Four-piston calipers. size 320 mm (12.6 inches) at the front and Single disc. ABS. size 220 mm (8.7 inches) at the back. 

Yamaha YZF-R1 General Information

BrandYamaha 
ModelYamaha YZF-R1 
Start year2019 
Year2019 
CategorySport 
Factory Warranty (Years / miles)1 Year Limited Factory Warranty 

Yamaha YZF-R1 Dimensions, Aerodynamics and weight

Frame typeAluminum Deltabox 
Seat details
Wheelbase1,405 mm (55.3 inches) 
Length2,055 mm (80.9 inches) 
Width691 mm (27.2 inches) 
Height1,151 mm (45.3 inches) 
Seat Height856 mm (33.7 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting. 
Alternate Seat Height
Ground Clearance
Trail size102 mm (4.0 inches) 
Wheels details
Front Tyres - Rims dimensions120/70-ZR17 
Rear Tyres - Rims dimensions190/55-ZR17 
Front brakesDouble disc. ABS. Hydraulic. Four-piston calipers. 
Rear brakesSingle disc. ABS. 
Front Brakes Dimensions - Disc Dimensions320 mm (12.6 inches) 
Rear Brakes Dimensions - Disc Dimensions220 mm (8.7 inches) 
Curb Weight (including fluids)200.0 kg (441.0 pounds) 
Dry Weight
Front Percentage of Weight
Rear Percentage of Weight
Weight-Power Output Ratio :
Fuel Tank Capacity17.03 litres (4.50 gallons) 
Reserve Fuel Capacity
Carrying Details and Capacity
Front Suspension43mm KYB® inverted fork; fully adjustable 
Front Suspension Travel119 mm (4.7 inches) 
Rear SuspensionKYB® piggyback shock, 4-way adjustable 
Rear Suspension Travel119 mm (4.7 inches) 

Yamaha YZF-R1 Engine and Transmission Technical Data

Engine type - Number of cylindersIn-line four, four-stroke 
Engine detailsCrossplane crankshaft technology. Titanium intake valves. 
Fuel systemInjection. Fuel Injection with YCC-T and YCC-I 
Engine size - Displacement - Engine capacity998.00 ccm (60.90 cubic inches) 
Bore x Stroke79.0 x 50.9 mm (3.1 x 2.0 inches) 
Compression Ratio13.0:1 
Number of valves per cylinder
Camshaft Valvetrain ConfigurationDouble Overhead Cams/Twin Cam (DOHC) 
Maximum power - Output - Horsepower200.00 HP (146.0 kW)) @ 13500 RPM 
Maximum torque112.40 Nm (11.5 kgf-m or 82.9 ft.lbs) @ 11500 RPM 
Engine Maximum RPM
Cooling systemLiquid 
Lubrication system
Engine oil capacity3.90 litres (4.12 quarts) 
Exhaust systemTitanium Exhaust 
Gearbox6-speed 
Transmission type, final drive ratioChain 
Clutch typeMultiplate assist and slipper clutch 
DrivelineO-ring chain 

Yamaha YZF-R1 Performance

Top Speed
Acceleration 0 to 100 km/h (0 to 62 mph)
Acceleration 0 to 400m (1/4 mile)
Recuperation 60 to 140 km/h in highest gear
Fuel Consumption - MPG - Economy - Efficiency6.92 litres/100 km (14.5 km/l or 33.99 mpg) 
CO2 emissions160.5 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) 
Emissions

Yamaha YZF-R1 Electrical Systems, Ignition and Equipment

Ignition TypeTCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition 
Electrical Details
Starter TypeElectric 
Instruments
Lights

How much horsepower does a Yamaha YZF-R1 have?
The Yamaha YZF-R1 has 200.00 HP (146.0 kW)) @ 13500 RPM.

How tall (seat height) is a Yamaha YZF-R1?
The Yamaha YZF-R1 seat height is 856 mm (33.7 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting.

How many gears does a Yamaha YZF-R1 have?
The Yamaha YZF-R1 have 6 gears.

Sours: https://www.ultimatespecs.com/motorcycles-specs/yamaha/yamaha-yzf-r1-2019

Similar news:

Yamaha YZF-R1

sport motorcycle

The Yamaha YZF-R1, or R1, is a 1,000 cc (61 cu in) class sport bike made by Yamaha since 1998.[2]

1998–1999[edit]

Yamaha launched the YZF-R1 after redesigning the Genesis engine to create a more compact engine by raising the gearbox input shaft and allowing the gearbox output shaft to be placed beneath it. This 'stacked gearbox' was followed by other manufacturers. Compacting the engine made the engine much shorter, allowing the wheelbase to be shortened. This allowed the frame design to place the weight of the engine in the frame to aid handling because of an optimized center of gravity. The swingarm could be made longer without compromising the overall wheelbase, which was a short 1,385 mm (54.5 in). Four 40 mm Keihin CV carburetors fed fuel to the engine. It had KYB upside down 41 mm front forks and 300 mm semi-floating disk brakes. The instrument panel was electrical with a self diagnosis system and digital speed readout. The exhaust system used Yamaha's Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve (EXUP), which controlled the exhaust gas flow to maximize engine power production at all revs. This created a high powered and high torque engine. The Yamaha YZF-R6 was introduced in 1999 as the 600 cc version of the R1 super bike.

The 1999 R1 saw only minor changes, apart from paint and graphics. More improvements were a redesigned gear change linkage and the gear change shaft length being increased. Fuel tank reserve capacity was reduced from 5.5 to 4.0 L (1.21 to 0.88 imp gal; 1.5 to 1.1 US gal), while the total fuel tank capacity was unchanged at 18 l (4.0 imp gal; 4.8 US gal).

Motorcycle Consumer News tests of the 1998 model year YZF-R1 yielded a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 2.96 seconds and 0 to 100 mph (0 to 161 km/h) of 5.93 seconds, a0 to 1⁄4 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) time of 10.19 seconds at 131.40 mph (211.47 km/h), and a top speed of 168 mph (270 km/h), with deceleration from 60 to 0 mph (97 to 0 km/h) of 113.9 ft (34.7 m).[1] For the 1999 model year, Cycle World tests recorded a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 3.0 seconds, 0 to 1⁄4 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) time of 10.31 seconds at 139.55 mph (224.58 km/h), and a top speed of 170 mph (270 km/h).[3]

2000–2001[edit]

In 2000, Yamaha introduced a series of changes to improve the bike, and minor changes to the bodywork to allow for better long duration ride handling. Yamaha's main design goal was to sharpen the pre-existing bike and not to redesign it. The dry weight was reduced five pounds to 414 lb (188 kg).[4]

At 127.8 hp (95.3 kW) at the rear wheel,[4] top-end output remained the same, but changes to the engine management system were intended to result in a smoother, broader distribution of power. The bodywork was still unmistakably R1, although a few changes were made resulting in a 3% reduction in the drag coefficient. The headlight housing's profile was sharpened, the side panels were made more aerodynamic and slippery, and the windscreen was reshaped for better rider protection.

The seating area was also updated. The fuel tank was reshaped, with a more relaxed rear angle and deeper leg recesses to provide for a better rider feel. The seat extended further towards the rear of the tank and the new, steeper, seating position put additional weight on the front end. All of this was aimed at improving weight bias and offering sharper cornering and more stability.

Mechanically, the carburetors were re-jetted in an effort to improve throttle response, especially in the low end, all the way up to the bike's 11,750 rpm redline. The redesigned camshafts were lightened and used internal oil ways to lubricate journals that, when combined with reduced tappet clearance, provided less friction and created less engine noise. The gearbox received a taller first gear, a hollow chrome moly shift shaft with an additional bearing and a completely redesigned shift linkage and foot pedal. These changes were aimed at eliminating problems with the transmission in earlier models, and to help to seamlessly transfer the bike's power to the road.

2002–2003[edit]

2002 YZF-R1 with aftermarket high-mount exhaust

A new fuel injection system was introduced for the 2002 year, which worked like a carburetor by employing a CV carburetor slide controlled by vacuum created by the engine. With a similar power output to the 2000-2001 bike, the engine remained largely the same. One notable improvement was the use of new cylinder sleeves of a high silicon content alloy containing magnesium that minimized heat induced distortion, reducing oil consumption. Also in 2002, Yamaha released the newly developed Deltabox frame,[5] which, with its hydro formed construction, reduced the total number of frame welds. These changes improved the frame's rigidity by 30%. The cooling system was redesigned for better performance and compactness. The exhaust system was changed from a 4-into-1 to a new titanium 4-into-2-into-1 design. The rear end of the motorcycle was updated and streamlined with a LED taillight. This allowed for very clean rear body lines when choosing one of several common after market modifications, such as removal of the turn signal stalks and stock license plate bracket; and replacing them with assorted available replacements that "hug" the body or frame. Also, front end lighting was improved in 2002, between the higher definition headlights and also side "parking" lights within the twin-headlight panel, giving a more angular appearance. This also gave additional after market possibilities, such as to remove the front turn signals and use these front lights as directional or hazard markers while stopped. For 2003, the only change was fitted hazard warning lights and dipped headlights, which stay on all the time the engine is running.

In 2002, Cycle World reported fuel mileage of 38 mpg‑US (6.2 L/100 km; 46 mpg‑imp), a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 2.9 seconds, a 0 to 1⁄4 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) time of 10.32 seconds at 137.60 mph (221.45 km/h), and a top speed of 167 mph (269 km/h).[6]

2004–2005[edit]

With the competition advancing, Yamaha made some major changes to the model. This included style updates, like an under seat twin exhaust, and performance upgrades including radial brakes, and, for the first time an R1 Ram-air intake. Furthermore, the tendency for wheelies by earlier productions was reduced by changing the geometry of the frame and weight distribution. The all-new engine was no longer used as a stressed member of the chassis, and had a separate top crankcase and cylinder block.

2005 YZF-R1 instrumentation

The 2004 R1 weighs 172 kg (379 lb) dry. The conventional front brake calipers were replaced by radially mounted calipers, activated by a radial master cylinder. A factory-installed steering damper was also added this year. Combined with the changes to the frame, this helped to eliminate the tendency of the handlebars to shake violently during rapid acceleration or deceleration on less-than-perfect surfaces, a phenomenon known as a speed wobble or tank slapper.

Motorcycle Consumer News tests of the 2004 model year YZF-R1S yielded a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 3.04 seconds and 0 to 100 mph (0 to 161 km/h) of 5.42 seconds, a quarter-mile time of 9.90 seconds at 144.98 mph (233.32 km/h), and a top speed of 179 mph (288 km/h).[1]

John McGuinness won the senior race at the 2005 Isle of Man TT.

2006[edit]

The swingarm was extended by 20 mm (0.79 in) to reduce acceleration instability. In this year, Yamaha also released a limited edition version in original Yamaha racing colors to celebrate its 50th anniversary. The model (LE/SP) had a Kenny Roberts front and rear custom Öhlins suspension units developed by the same team as the YZR-M1 MotoGP bike. Custom forged aluminum Marchesini wheels specifically designed for the LE shaved nearly a pound off the unsprung weight. A back torque-limiting slipper clutch, and an integrated lap timer rounded out the package, making the LE virtually a production racer. Only 500 units were made for the United States with another 500 units for Europe.

2007–2008[edit]

An all-new YZF-R1 for the 2007 model year was announced on 8 October 2006. It had an all-new inline four-cylinder engine, going back to a more conventional four-valves per cylinder, rather than Yamaha's trade mark five-valve Genesis layout. It also had the Yamaha Chip Control Intake (YCC-I) electronic variable-length intake funnel system, Yamaha Chip Control Throttle (YCC-T) fly-by-wire throttle system, slipper-type clutch, all-new aluminum Deltabox frame and swingarm, six-piston radial-mount front brake calipers with 310 mm discs, a wider radiator, and M1 styling on the new large ram-air ports in the front fairing. There were no major changes for 2008. Power at the rear wheel was 156.7 hp (116.9 kW) @ 10,160 rpm.[7]

Motorcycle Consumer News tests of the 2007 model year YZF-R1 yielded a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 2.94 seconds and 0 to 100 mph (0 to 161 km/h) of 5.46 seconds, a ¼ mile time of 9.88 seconds at 145.50 mph (234.16 km/h).[1]

2009–2014[edit]

2009 YZF-R1 Limited Launch Edition

In late 2008, Yamaha announced they would release an all new R1 for 2009. The new R1 takes engine technology from the M1 MotoGP bike with its cross plane crankshaft. Crossplane technology puts each connecting rod 90° from the next, with an uneven firing interval of 270°- 180°- 90°- 180°. The 2009 R1 was the first production sportbike to use a crossplane crankshaft.[8] The power delivery is the same as a 90° V4 with a 180° crank, such as the Honda VFR800 and very similar to the Yamaha V-Max which has been lauded for its exhaust sound.[9] Yamaha claims the bike would give the rider 'two engines in one', the low end torque of a twin and the pace of an inline four. As with previous incarnations of the R1, the 2009 model keeps its Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T).

Another advancement included on the 2009 model was D-Mode Throttle Control Valve Mapping, which allows a rider to choose between three distinct maps depending on the rider's environment. Each mode of operation controls YCC-T characteristics, changing how the R1 reacts to rider input. The first mode is Standard Mode, which delivers performance for a wide variety of driving conditions. The second mode is "A" mode which will give a rider more available power in the lower to mid RPM range. The third mode is "B" mode, which is a dial back of the previous mode, designed to soften throttle response in inclement weather and heavy traffic. D-Mode throttle control is controlled by the rider through a forward mode button near the throttle. The instrument panel is more comprehensive than previous models, and the 2009/2010 Yamaha YZF-R1 model had a gear indicator as standard.

Overall handling of the R1 was improved through changes to frame and suspension. A new sub frame was designed for the 2009 R1, cast from magnesium giving lower weight aiding mass centralisation. The rear shock absorber on the 2009 offers variable speed damping, as well as an easy to tweak pre-load via a screw adjustment. The rear shock now connects underneath the swing arm through a different linkage; a change from previous years' models. To improve overall handling and safety, Yamaha included an electronic steering damper.

The front has the same classic R1 shape, though the air intake location and headlamp design have been revamped on the 2009 model; using only projector lamps, and using the new-found design space within the nose cone to reroute ram air tubes next to the lights.

Testing the 2010 model year in the confines of a tri-oval racetrack, Motorcyclist magazine reported a 0 to 1⁄4 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) time of 10.02 seconds @ 144.23 mph (232.12 km/h), and fuel consumption of 25 mpg‑US (9.4 L/100 km; 30 mpg‑imp).[10]Motorcycle Consumer News reported a tested top speed of 176.7 mph (284.4 km/h).[1]

In 2012 the Yamaha YZF-R1 received traction control, redesigned upper cowl (nose of bike), and a special edition 50th Anniversary R1 was released. The special edition color is inspired from Assen TT-winning MotoGP bike. The special edition commemorates the participation of Yamaha in MotoGP. Only 2000 units of this edition were made.

2015–present[edit]

Yamaha R1M at 2015 Tokyo Motor Show

At the centennial EICMA motorcycle show, Yamaha officially unveiled a new generation of R1.[11] It is similar to MotoGP's 2005–Present YZR M1. Yamaha claims a wet weight of 199 kg (439 lb)[12] The new bike has an electronics package that includes a sophisticated Traction Control (TCS) and Slide Control System (SCS), antiwheelie Lift Control System (LIF), linked antilock brakes, Launch Control System (LCS), Quick Shift System (QSS), and selectable power modes. The Slide Control System on the Yamaha YZF-R1 is the first on a production motorcycle.[13][14] Information is fed to the bike through a six-axis gyro (Inertial measurement unit) and other sensors over 100 times a second.[14] Power delivery is tapered through manipulation of the throttle butterfly and ignition and fuel cuts.[15] Engine changes include shortened bore-to-stroke ratio, larger airbox, a finger-follower valve system, and fracture split titanium conrods.[13] It comes standard with magnesium wheels. Information is presented to the rider through a user-customizable thin-film display.[13]

A second higher-spec, limited production model is also produced called the R1M, and is differentiated from the standard model by having more expensive components such as electronic semi-active Öhlins suspension, carbon fiber bodywork, Yamaha's Communication Control Unit (CCU), Y-TRAC data logging system, and stickier Bridgestone tires with larger rear 200/55-size. A third model starting in 2016 is also offered a lower-spec R1S.[16][17]

Specifications[edit]

Year 1998 - 1999[3][18]2000–2001[19][20]2002 - 2003[6][21]2004–2005 2006 2006 LE 2007[22]-2008 2009[10]2010[23]2012-2014[24]2015–present[25]
Engine
Type 998 cc (60.9 cu in), liquid-cooled, 20-valve, DOHC, inline four-cylinder 998 cc, liquid-cooled, 16-valve, DOHC, inline four-cylinder 998 cc, liquid-cooled, 16-valve (titanium), DOHC, in-line four-cylinder, cross-plane crankshaft
Bore × stroke 74 mm × 58 mm (2.9 in × 2.3 in) 77 mm × 53.6 mm (3.03 in × 2.11 in) 78 mm × 52.2 mm (3.07 in × 2.06 in) 79.0 mm x 50.9 mm
Fuel system Carburetor Mikuni BDSR40 carburetors with TPS Mikuni fuel injection Fuel injection, motor-driven secondary throttle valves Fuel injection, dual-valve throttle bodies with motor-driven secondary valves Fuel Injection with YCC-T and YCC-I
Compression ratio 11.8:1 12.5:1 12.7:1 12.3 : 1 13.0 : 1
Rev limiter 13,750 rpm
Manufacturer rated horsepower (crank) 150 hp (110 kW)[26]150.0 hp (111.9 kW) @ 10,000 rpm 152.0 hp (113.3 kW) @ 10,500 rpm 172 hp (128 kW), 180 hp (130 kW) with ram air[27][28]132.4 kW (177.6 hp) @ 12,500 rpm / 139.0 kW (186.4 hp) @ 12,500 rpm with ram air [29]191 hp (142 kW) @ 12,500 rpm without ram air [30]199 hp (148 kW)[15]
200.0 hp (149.1 kW)(with track only Circuit ECU)[15]
Rear wheel horsepower 129.4 hp (96.5 kW),[1] 129.3 hp (96.4 kW) @ 10,550 rpm[3]130 hp (97 kW)[20]127.2 hp (94.9 kW),[1] 134.1 hp (100.0 kW) @10,800 rpm[6]152.9 hp (114.0 kW) @ 10,160 rpm,[7] 156.7 hp (116.9 kW)[1]180.7 hp (134.7 kW)[1]188.4 hp (140.5 kW)@ 12,720 rpm[31]
Torque 72.7 lb⋅ft (98.6 N⋅m),[1] 72.0 lb⋅ft (97.6 N⋅m) @ 8,250 rpm[3]70.4 lb⋅ft (95.4 N⋅m)[1]106.6 N⋅m (78.6 lbf⋅ft) @ 10,500 rpm (claimed) [28]75.5 lb⋅ft (102.4 N⋅m),[1] 73.6 lb⋅ft (99.8 N⋅m) @ 8,150 rpm[6]76.2 lb⋅ft (103.3 N⋅m)[10]78.6 lb⋅ft (106.6 N⋅m),@ 8,790 rpm [31] (rear wheel)
Final drive #530 O-ring chain 525 O-ring chain
Ignition TCI
Transmission 6-speed w/multi-plate clutch 6-speed w/multi-plate slipper clutch 6-speed w/multi-plate coil spring slipper clutch
Chassis
Brakes/Front Dual 298 mm discs Dual 320 mm discs, radial-mount forged 4-piston calipers Dual 310 mm discs, radial-mount forged 6-piston calipers Hydraulic dual disc, Ø 320 mm
Brakes/Rear Single Piston (Pin Sliding) Caliper w/ 240 mm disc Single Piston (Pin Sliding) Caliper w/ 220 mm disc
Suspension/Front 41 mm inverted telescopic fork 43 mm inverted telescopic fork, 120 mm (4.7 in) travel
Suspension/Rear Single shock, adj. preload, compression damping, rebound damping, 130 mm (5.1 in) travel Single shock, 130 mm (5.1 in) travel Single shock, adj. preload, compression damping, rebound damping, 130 mm (5.1 in) travel Single Öhlins shock, adj. preload, adj. high-/low-speed compression damping, rebound damping, 130 mm (5.1 in) travel Single shock, piggyback reservoir, spring preload, adj. high-/low-speed compression damping, rebound damping Swingarm, 120 mm travel (link suspension), Monoshock, 120 mm travel Swingarm, (link suspension), 120 mm travel
Tires/Front 120/70-ZR17
Tires/Rear 190/50-ZR17 190/55-ZR17
Dimensions
Length 2,035 mm (80.1 in) 2,065 mm (81.3 in) 2,090 mm (82.1 in) 2,060 mm (81.1 in) 2,070 mm (81.5 in) 2,070 mm (81 in) 2,055 mm (80.9 in)
Width 695 mm (27.4 in) 720 mm (28 in) 720 mm (28.3 in) 710 mm (28.1 in) 715 mm (28.1 in) 690 mm (27 in)
Height 1,095 mm (43.1 in) 1,105 mm (43.5 in) 1,100 mm (43.5 in) 1,110 mm (43.7 in) 1,130 mm (44.5 in) 1,130 mm (44 in) 1,150 mm (45 in)
Seat height 800 mm (31 in) 815 mm (32.1 in) 818 mm (32.2 in) 815 mm (32.1 in) 835 mm (32.9 in) 830 mm (32.8 in) 835 mm (32.9 in) 855 mm (33.7 in)
Wheelbase 1,415 mm (55.7 in) (1,394 mm (54.9 in) claimed)[18][26]1,395 mm (54.9 in) 1,415 mm (55.7 in)
Rake 24.0°
Trail 92 mm (3.6 in) 103 mm (4.1 in) 97 mm (3.8 in) 100 mm (4.0 in) 102 mm (4.0 in) 102 mm (4.0 in)
Fuel capacity 18 l (4.0 imp gal; 4.8 US gal) 17 l (3.7 imp gal; 4.5 US gal) 18 l (4.0 imp gal; 4.8 US gal) 18 l (4.0 imp gal; 4.8 US gal) 17 l (3.7 imp gal; 4.5 US gal)
Dry weight190.1 kg (419 lb)[3]187.8 kg (414 lb)[20]187 kg (412 lb)[6]172.0 kg (379.2 lb) 172.8 kg (381 lb) 173.7 kg (383 lb) 177 kg (390 lb)[29]177 kg (390 lb),[32] 203.2 kg (448 lb)[10]
Wet weight* 198.2 kg (437 lb) (claimed)[26]200.9 kg (443 lb)[20]193 kg (425 lb), 194 kg (428 lb) (Cali)[33]206 kg (454 lb) (claimed),[30] 216.4 kg (477 lb)[10]206 kg 199 kg (439 lb) [12]
Performance
Top speed 270 km/h (168 mph)[1]278 km/h (173 mph)[1]288 km/h (179 mph)[1]293 km/h (182 mph)[1]
0 to 97 km/h (0 to 60 mph) 2.96[1] sec. 2.99[1] sec. 3.04[1] sec. 2.64[1] sec.
0 to 161 km/h (0 to 100 mph) 5.93[1] sec. 5.79[1] sec. 5.42[1] sec. 5.12[1] sec.
0 to 1⁄4 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) 10.19[1] sec. 10.17[1] sec. 9.90[1] sec. 9.88[1] sec. 10.05[1] sec. 10.31 @ 148.12 [34]
10.11 sec. @ 146.62 mph [31]
9.83 sec. @ 149.91 mph [35]
Braking 97 to 0 km/h (60 to 0 mph) 34.7 m (113.9 ft)[1]35.1 m (115.3 ft)[1]35.8 m (117.3 ft)[1]35.9 m (117.9 ft)[1]37.8 m (124.0 ft)[1]38.4 m (126.0 ft)[31]
Fuel consumption 5.50 L/100 km; 51.4 mpg‑imp (42.8 mpg‑US)[1]5.67 L/100 km; 49.8 mpg‑imp (41.5 mpg‑US)[1]5.65 L/100 km; 50.0 mpg‑imp (41.6 mpg‑US)[1]6.53 L/100 km; 43.2 mpg‑imp (36.0 mpg‑US)[1]8.0 L/100 km; 35.3 mpg‑imp (29.4 mpg‑US)[1]
  • Includes oil and full fuel tank.

Motorsport[edit]

The bike had five wins in the Macau Grand Prix between 1999 and 2013. Lorenzo Alfonsi won the 2004 FIM Superstock 1000 Cup, followed by Didier Van Keymeulen in 2005.[36] Yamaha World Superbike riders Troy Corser and Noriyuki Haga finished 2nd and 3rd respectively in the 2008 Superbike World Championship season.[36] Yamaha World Superbike rider Ben Spies won the 2009 Superbike World Championship season title recording 14 wins and 11 poles in his one season in WSBK.[36] The Yamaha Factory Racing Team with riders N. Nakasuga, P. Espargaro, and B. Smith won the 2015 Suzuka 8 Hours endurance race.[37] Katsuyuki Nakasuga, Alex Lowes, Pol Espargaro won the 2016 Suzuka 8 Hours endurance Race. Tommy Hill won the British Superbike title in 2011 on board a YZF-R1. Yamaha rider Josh Brookes won the 2015 British Superbike series title.[38]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzaaabacadaeafagahaiajakalam"Performance Index - Winter '11/'12 Edition"(PDF), Motorcycle Consumer News, Bowtie Magazines, January 2012, retrieved May 31, 2012
  2. ^
    • "Performance Index - Winter '11/'12 Edition"(PDF), Motorcycle Consumer News, Bowtie Magazines, January 2012, retrieved May 31, 2012
    • Cernicky, Mark (September 2008), "Master Bike XI", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 47 no. 8, ISSN 0011-4286
    • Brown, Roland (2005), The ultimate history of fast motorcycles, Bath, England: Parragon, pp. 215, 258, ISBN 
    • Walker, Mick (2001), "Superbikes", Performance Motorcycles, Amber Books, Ltd. and Chartwell Books (Book Sales, Inc.), pp. 26–57, ISBN 
  3. ^ abcdeCatterson, Brian (May 1999), "YZF-R1", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 38 no. 5, pp. 47–50, ISSN 0011-4286
  4. ^ ab"Sport Rider: Yamaha Weights and Measurements", Sport Rider, 2009, archived from the original on March 12, 2009
  5. ^Mayhersohn, Norman (November 1987), "Yamaha FZR", Popular Mechanics, p. 48
  6. ^ abcdeCanet, Don (June 2002), "Show of Force; Turn and burn aboard the Sport Fours", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 41 no. 6, pp. 46–50, ISSN 0011-4286
  7. ^ abCernicky, Mark (September 2008), "Master Bike XI", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 47 no. 8, ISSN 0011-4286
  8. ^2009 Yamaha YZF-R1 Features Uneven Firing Order For Improved Power Delivery, Yamaha press release via Road Racing World, 2008, retrieved 2009-05-23
  9. ^2009 Star V-Max Review/Test, Motorcycle.com, August 26, 2008, archived from the original on 1 May 2010, retrieved 2010-04-20
  10. ^ abcdeHenning, Ari (April 2010), "Liter-bike outliers: different for a reason.(MC Comparison Aprilia RSV4R VS. Yamaha YZF-R1)", Motorcyclist, pp. 62–68, retrieved 2011-04-26
  11. ^"Home - Eicma". eicma.it.
  12. ^ ab"2018 Yamaha YZF-R1 Supersport Motorcycle - Photo Gallery, Video, Specs, Features, Offers, Inventory and more". www.yamahamotorsports.com.
  13. ^ abcConner, Blake (June 22, 2015). "2015 Yamaha YZF-R1 - ROAD TEST". Cycle World. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  14. ^ abKlein, Max (July 20, 2015). "2015 Yamaha YZF-R1: MD Ride Review". Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  15. ^ abcConner, Blake (February 21, 2015). "2015 Yamaha YZF-R1/R1M - First Ride". Cycle World. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  16. ^Canet, Don (July 1, 2016). "2016 Yamaha YZF-R1M vs. YZF-R1S - COMPARISON TEST". Cycle World. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  17. ^Adams, Bradley (February 26, 2015). "2015 Yamaha YZF-R1M First Ride Review". Sport Rider. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  18. ^ abCanet, Don (February 1998), "Rippin' Ride", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 37 no. 2, pp. 32–36, ISSN 0011-4286
  19. ^2000 YZF-R1 specifications from Yamaha Motors
  20. ^ abcd"Superbikes 2000!", Motorcyclist, pp. 41–62, July 2000
  21. ^2002 YZF-R1 specifications from Yamaha Motors
  22. ^2007 YZF-R1 specifications from Yamaha Motors
  23. ^"[title] Motor". yamaha-motor.eu. Retrieved 2016-03-25.
  24. ^UK, Yamaha Motor. "[title]". yamaha-motor.eu. Retrieved 2016-03-25.
  25. ^UK, Yamaha Motor. "[title]". yamaha-motor.eu. Retrieved 2016-03-25.
  26. ^ abcAnderson, Steve (December 1997), "YZF R1; Something wicked this way comes", Cycle World, Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., vol. 36 no. 12, pp. 34–39, ISSN 0011-4286
  27. ^Tech. Spec--2004-YZF-R1 from Yamaha Motor Europe
  28. ^ ab"Specs; Yamaha YZF-R1", The Sunday Times, Perth, Western Australia, p. R.76, 11 September 2005
  29. ^ abTech. Spec--2007-YZF-R1 from Yamaha Motor Europe
  30. ^ ab2009 Yamaha YZF-R1 from Yamaha Motor Europe
  31. ^ abcdAdams, Bradley (July 19, 2016). "Aprilia RSV4 RR vs. Ducati 959 Panigale vs. Kawasaki ZX-10R vs. Yamaha YZF-R1 - COMPARISON TEST". Cycle World. Retrieved July 20, 2016.
  32. ^"2009 Yamaha R1 Reportedly Heavier and Less Powerful than the 2007 R1 - Asphalt & Rubber". asphaltandrubber.com. 15 April 2009.
  33. ^2002 Yamaha YZF-R1 Service Manual
  34. ^"Sportbike Performance Numbers". Sport Rider. February 25, 2014. Retrieved 2016-09-05.
  35. ^Canet, Don (June 24, 2015), "Comparison: Yamaha YZF-R1 By The Numbers", Cycle World
  36. ^ abc"WorldSBK". www.worldsbk.com.
  37. ^http://www.fimewc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Offcial-Race-Results1.pdf
  38. ^"2018 Bennetts British Superbike Championship in association with Pirelli". www.britishsuperbike.com.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_YZF-R1


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