Orange moth georgia

Orange moth georgia DEFAULT

Family: Saturniidae

Subfamily: Ceratocampinae

Identification: Females can be twice as large as males. Upperside of female is yellow-orange to yellow-brown; forewing has a white cell spot and varying amounts of scattered black specks. Upperside of male is reddish orange to brownish orange; forewing is narrow with a small white cell spot and a small whitish translucent patch.

Wing Span: 1 3/16 - 2 inches (3 - 5 cm).

Life History: Adults are day fliers. Mating takes place from late morning to early afternoon, and in late afternoon or dusk, females begin laying eggs in large clumps on the underside of oak leaves. Eggs hatch in about 2 weeks and are gregarious when young. Fully-grown caterpillars pupate and overwinter in shallow underground chambers.

Flight: One brood from June-July.

Caterpillar Hosts: Various oaks (Quercus) and perhaps chinquapin (Castanea pumila).

Adult Food: Adults do not feed.

Habitat: Deciduous forests.

Range: Southern Maine west across the Great Lakes region to central Minnesota; south to central Georgia, central Alabama, central Mississippi, Louisiana, and east Texas.

Conservation: Caterpillar populations can be large enough to cause severe defoliation of oaks.

NCGR: G5 - Demonstrably secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.

Management Needs: None reported.

Sours: https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Anisota-senatoria

Georgia Moth Series – Indianmeal Moth

There are over 160,000 species of moths in the United States. Moths are a group of insects that are related to butterflies. They belong to the Lepidoptera order. There are more than 54 moth species documented in Georgia.

In this series, we will discuss the following moths:

Indianmeal Moth

The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), is also spelled Indian-meal moth and Indian meal moth. It is a very common household pest, feeding principally on stored food products. Other common names for this moth are weevil moth, pantry moth, flour moth or grain moth.

The Indianmeal moth it has been called the most troublesome pest of stored products commonly found in American homes or grocery stores. The larvae are general feeders and can be found in cereals, whole grains, grain products, bird seeds, dried fruit, dog food, dried milk, nuts, and spices. This moth received its common name from the United States where it was found to be a pest of meal made of “Indian corn” or maize.

As they feed and crawl, the larvae spin silken threads which causes the damage. This process webs the particles of food together. Afterward, small moths fly in a zigzag fashion around kitchens and other indoor areas.

Classification

Here is the classification breakdown:

Kingdom Animalia (Animals)

Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Class Insecta (Insects)

Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)

Family Pyralidae

Tribe Phycitini

Genus Plodia

Species P. Interpunctella

Identification

Indianmeal moths have a 5/8 inch wingspan and are pale gray. They are easily distinguished from other grain infesting moths by the reddish-brown or coppery luster of their outer forewing. Fully grown larvae are 1/2 inch and have brown heads and are dirty white, sometimes tinged with green, yellow or pink. They are extremely active.

Life Cycle

Adult females are known to deposit up to 300 eggs near or on food materials. Within two weeks, larvae hatch and begin actively feeding. As they move they spin silken threads throughout the infested foods, which may become matted with webbing. For approximately two weeks until fully grown, larvae feed and select a pupation site (cracks and crevices, pantry walls, ceilings) where they spin cocoons. Pupae transform into adults in about 30 days. The entire life-cycle requires 4-6 weeks to complete, and there may be five overlapping generations per year, depending on temperature.

The Indianmeal moth is often introduced into a home through packaged dry food goods and groceries purchased at the store.

How to Control

  1. Inspect foods for possible infestation before you purchase. Look for webbing and small holes in the packaging.
  2. Store susceptible food products in tightly sealed containers.
  3. Infested food items can be thrown away or salvaged by freezing for one week.
  4. Clean up food spills promptly, paying close attention to cracks and crevices.
  5. Vacuum problem areas in the kitchen. Empty after use to prevent reinfestation.
  6. The Pantry Pest Trap uses a powerful attractant to detect adult moths.
  7. Release Trichogramma wasps to attack and destroy pest eggs. These tiny beneficial insects are very effective because they prevent the pest from reaching the destructive larval stage.
  8. Apply organic diatomaceous earth for long-lasting protection. It looks like broken glass under the microscope. DE kills by scoring an insect’s outer layer as it crawls over the fine powder. Contains NOtoxic poisons!
  9. Made from citrus peel extract, Orange Guard kills and repels many bugs on contact. Spray anywhere insects hide — in kitchens, pantries and under cabinets and appliances! Safe for use around food, people, and pets.

Please let our team of professionals help you with any pests in your home and property. Don’t spend your valuable time dealing with things that we can handle for you. If you’re in any of the surrounding areas, give Proactive Pest Control a call at 770-800-PEST or 770-800-7378.

Contact Us

Choose Proactive Pest Control for professional, comprehensive, guaranteed pest, and lawn management. The pros at Proactive will work diligently to gain your trust, confidence, and your total satisfaction. CALL US TODAY at 770-800-PEST to schedule a free, no-obligation inspection and evaluation for your home or business. Or, contact us for a FREE consultation. Let us show you why Proactive Pest Control is northeast Georgia’s first choice for pest, termite, and lawn services.

Pest ControlGeorgiamothsPest ControlProactive Pest Control

Sours: https://proactivepestga.com/pest-control-blog/georgia-moth-series-indianmeal-moth
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Butterflies and Moths of Georgia (477 Found)

InsectIdentifiction.org site logo image
InsectIdentifiction.org site logo image

Insects | Georgia


Listing of Butterfly Or Moth insects that can be found in the state/territory of Georgia

Note: Please note that insects do not adhere to man-drawn borders on a map and as such they may be found beyond their listed 'reach' showcased on our website. Insects are typically drawn to a given area by available food supply, weather, environmental factors (pollution, etc...), water supply, mating patterns, etc... and can be territorial. Therefore consider the list below as a general indicator of the insects, bugs and spiders that may be found in a given state or province.

The list below showcases all Butterflies and Moths related to the state/territory of Georgia currently in the InsectIdentification.org database. Entries are listed below in alphabetical order (A-to-Z). As with our other list pages, you can click on the small 'X' in each entry to remove unneeded/unwanted entries in the result.
Sours: https://www.insectidentification.org/insects-by-type-and-region.php?thisState=georgia&thisType=Butterfly%20or%20Moth

Georgia Moth Series – Eight-Spotted Forester Moth

There are over 160,000 species of moths in the United States. Moths are a group of insects that are related to butterflies. They belong to the Lepidoptera order. There are more than 54 moth species documented in Georgia.

In this series, we will discuss the following moths:

Eight-Spotted Forester Moth

Because of the eight large white patches on the back of the wings of the Eight-spotted Forester Moth, it is pretty easy to identify. Add to it bright orange-red leg hairs, and they become even more easy to notice.

This moth loves to fly around during the day around flowers, so it is often mistaken for a butterfly. It is found close to forests and woodlands.

Classification

Here is the classification breakdown:

Kingdom Animalia (Animals)

Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Class Insecta (Insects)

Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)

Family Noctuidae

Genus Alypia

Species Octomaculata

Size

Adult length .62 inches to 1.44 inches

Colors

Black, white, orange, red and yellow

Descriptors

Dots, 8, patches, flying

Forewing black with two pale yellow spots and inconspicuous metallic blue bands. Hindwing black with white spots in basal and median areas. Body black except for pale yellow tegulae and orange on the front and middle legs.

They have orange bands at each segment. Black dots cover their orange parts of the body. Alternating thin black and white bands fill the space between the orange ones. Thin white whiskers sparsely extend from head to the rear.

Flight

One flight during April – June in the north. Two flights in the south with one August brood. The wingspan is 3 to 3.7 cm.

Range

Maine and southern Quebec to Florida. West to South Dakota and Texas.

Caterpillar Hosts

They feed on the leaves of various vine plants, including grapevines, pepper vines, and creepers. Adults are believed to drink nectar from a variety of flowering plants.

Favorite host plants of the caterpillar are Virginia Creeper, Japanese Creeper and members of the grape family.

Breeding

Females lay fertilized eggs in early summer. In warmer states, two broods are produced each year. A second wave comes in August. Late season pupae overwinter inside cracks of logs. Cooler states and provinces produce only one generation a year.

Please let our team of professionals help you with any pests in your home and property. Don’t spend your valuable time dealing with things that we can handle for you. If you’re in any of the surrounding areas, give Proactive Pest Control a call at 770-800-PEST or 770-800-7378.

Contact Us

Choose Proactive Pest Control for professional, comprehensive, guaranteed pest, and lawn management. The pros at Proactive will work diligently to gain your trust, confidence, and your total satisfaction. CALL US TODAY at 770-800-PEST to schedule a free, no-obligation inspection and evaluation for your home or business. Or, contact us for a FREE consultation. Let us show you why Proactive Pest Control is northeast Georgia’s first choice for pest, termite, and lawn services.

Pest ControlGeorgiaMothPest ControlProactive Pest Control

Sours: https://proactivepestga.com/pest-control-blog/georgia-moth-series-eight-spotted-forester-moth

Moth georgia orange

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What's the difference between Moths and Butterflies?

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