Fake switch controller

Fake switch controller DEFAULT

Fake Pro Controllers for the Nintendo Switch hit the internet

In addition to the officially licensed controllers from console manufacturers, there are a plethora of third-party options when it comes to controllers for video game consoles. However, the recently released batch of Switch Pro Controller look-alikes is a bit different than your standard third-party fare.

As first reported by NintendoLife, these knockoff Switch controllers can currently be found on eBay and look a lot like the real thing. Currently listed as “Wireless Pro Controller Gamepad Joypad Remote For Nintendo Switch,” these controllers sell for just under 19 pounds ($25 U.S.) in the U.K. and sport a similar look to Nintendo’s official offering.

These third-party controllers go out of their way to make themselves look like an official Nintendo product. They feature the same button layout, color, general shape, and casing. Even the box features the familiar red-and-white color scheme found on many of Nintendo’s official products. However, these third-party offerings do not feature the official Nintendo logo and the box itself does not appear to have any branding, at least based on the eBay photos. This is rather odd considering that the majority of the third-party brands will feature their company name and logo rather prominently even if they work to imitate the design and feel of official controllers.

We have not tested out these third-party controllers, so we can’t vouch for their quality or lack thereof. It is worth noting that the seller’s page has an approval rating of 97.4 percent and is listed as an “eBay top-rated seller.” That being said, the seller did not produce these controllers, so the positive reviews can do little to provide much in the way of information regarding the controllers themselves.

It is possible that they work perfectly well, but the Nintendo-style advertising and lack of branding is enough to make us slightly wary of the products. If you’re not willing to take a chance on these controllers, there are plenty of other options available online. Nintendo’s official Pro Controller is available on the Nintendo Store, as well as at most retailers, and costs $70. Those looking for other options will find many third-party offerings including these awesome mini controllers from 8Bitdo.

Editors' Recommendations

Sours: https://www.digitaltrends.com/gaming/fake-switch-controllers/

Chinese bootleggers have flooded the market with fake Nintendo Switch Pro Controllers – but thankfully, they’re quite easy to identify.

The easiest way to identify a fake Pro Controller is the absence of the Nintendo Switch logo and other Nintendo branding on the back. On the left we have the real thing and on the right the fake bootleg.

A not very obvious sign is how the + and – buttons look like from above. On the real Nintendo Switch Pro Controllers, the buttons are flushed in, while on the fake bootleg, they are jutting out.

The battery looks different too – no Japanese words and the absence of the Nintendo logo.

switch-pro-controller-fake-vs-real-4
switch-pro-controller-fake-vs-real-3

These signs should be enough to help you spot a fake Nintendo Switch Pro Controller. For more, check out the video below:

Related

Sours: https://nintendosoup.com/fake-switch-pro-controllers-have-hit-the-market/
  1. Ct balloon creations
  2. Billy baldwin chair
  3. Saluspa filter housing
I recently purchased a XC2 pro controller off ebay for MSRP (69.99) and was looking forward to it. However, the HD rumble feels odd... some rumble scenarios don't get processed by it at all, like a hop before a drift in mario kart 8 deluxe and the light jump and fast fall rumble from smash ultimate. The controller also does a vibration when it can't connect to the switch after pressing a random button, unlike my other pro controllers.

The controller can read amiibo and the handles are shown as red on the home screen, but when I attempt to charge the controller in my power A charging dock it refuses to charge unlike my 100% real pro controllers... the battery also looks very real, but it doesn't have the nintendo logo.

Now, it seems as if I may have answered my own questions--but the thing that threw me for a loop is that the controller has the THX2ALLGAMEFANS! easter egg on the inside!

Have fakes really gotten this robust? Is my pro controller maybe defective? The smoking gun pointing at this controller being fake was the battery missing the nintendo logo (+the HD rumble feeling off) but the THX2ALLGAMEFANS! being on the controller is really throwing me off...
Computer engineer here. Know a good amount of electronics and I've disassembled joycons a few times.

Drill_Dozer posted...
The smoking gun pointing at this controller being fake was the battery missing the nintendo logo
Battery replacement might have happened. Would also agree with the new battery not playing nicely in normal circumstances.

Drill_Dozer posted...
THX2ALLGAMEFANS! being on the controller is really throwing me off.
IIRC that message is on the silkscreen of the PCB. I highly doubt a fake has that in it.

Drill_Dozer posted...
+the HD rumble feeling off
This could be any number of things-- placebo effect being the most likely in my opinion, or the battery outputs a weaker current than the rumble speaker expects and you get a less powerful or distinct vibration for it. Or a faulty speaker.

But I'm willing to wager the PCB is most likely real, meaning all the components soldered to it are the genuine article. You might try replacing the battery with an official Nintendo one, or at least measuring the voltage on it compared to an authentic to see if they're within 5%.

Going to bed, I'll answer any follow up questions you might have tomorrow.

Everything will turn out okay in the end. If it's not okay, it's not the end. This, too, will pass.

hmm looked at my old pro from what I can see through the case I don't see a nintendo logo on the battery, I see what looks like warnings in 7 languages.

Judgment100 posted...
IIRC that message is on the silkscreen of the PCB. I highly doubt a fake has that in it.

I agree I've seen lots of counterfeits of products in the past they generally don't bother with markings like that.

In all honesty it is probably just typical product variance.

AstralFrost: I need to be able to say that PSN alone outsold every aspect of the competition otherwise I don't think I can live with myself.

SyCo_VeNoM posted...

hmm looked at my old pro from what I can see through the case I don't see a nintendo logo on the battery, I see what looks like warnings in 7 languages.

I agree I've seen lots of counterfeits of products in the past they generally don't bother with markings like that.

In all honesty it is probably just typical product variance.
The nintendo logo and the battery type should be on the flip side of the warnings.

And this controller is a huge outlier if it is product variance

Judgment100 posted...

Computer engineer here. Know a good amount of electronics and I've disassembled joycons a few times.

Battery replacement might have happened. Would also agree with the new battery not playing nicely in normal circumstances.

IIRC that message is on the silkscreen of the PCB. I highly doubt a fake has that in it.

This could be any number of things-- placebo effect being the most likely in my opinion, or the battery outputs a weaker current than the rumble speaker expects and you get a less powerful or distinct vibration for it. Or a faulty speaker.

But I'm willing to wager the PCB is most likely real, meaning all the components soldered to it are the genuine article. You might try replacing the battery with an official Nintendo one, or at least measuring the voltage on it compared to an authentic to see if they're within 5%.

Going to bed, I'll answer any follow up questions you might have tomorrow.
Thanks for your reply. The HD rumble is definitely off, as I compared it to my other 2 controllers and got a second opinion, but your comments on the battery piqued my interest. I was doing all of these comparisons either the new controller having a near dead battery.

I'll charge it overnight and see if the battery having more juice boosts the HD rumble or something. Fingers crossed

Drill_Dozer posted...
Thanks for your reply. The HD rumble is definitely off, as I compared it to my other 2 controllers and got a second opinion, but your comments on the battery piqued my interest. I was doing all of these comparisons either the new controller having a near dead battery.

I'll charge it overnight and see if the battery having more juice boosts the HD rumble or something. Fingers crossed
Fingers crossed for you. I love my XBC2 pro controller.

I'm a little suspicious that it was MSRP on eBay, though; that doesn't sound right, last I checked they were going for at least $10-20 higher than MSRP.

Everything will turn out okay in the end. If it's not okay, it's not the end. This, too, will pass.

Alright, I tried the controller when fully charged and the rumble situation did not improve. Also while charging I noticed that the charge indicator light is a lighter orange than my other 2 pros haha.

This is so weird. Is the controller maybe just faulty? The battery is definitely not the official one as it is missing the nintendo branding, the controller's hd rumble is off, the charging light being the wrong shade of orange, and the controller feels light.

This is such a weird situation, the thx2allgamefans easter egg's presence throws my diagnosis as a fake out the window

Judgment100 posted...

Fingers crossed for you. I love my XBC2 pro controller.

I'm a little suspicious that it was MSRP on eBay, though; that doesn't sound right, last I checked they were going for at least $10-20 higher than MSRP.
Forgot to reply to you last time so doing it now for that notification

I don't believe a fake controller would even have the ability to read amiibo. To much effort for a fake. Maybe it is just defective.

MB Asus Prime Z590-p, i7-11700k, RTX 3070, 32GB, 1TB NVMe M.2, 4TB WD Black Drive

Drill_Dozer posted...
Forgot to reply to you last time so doing it now for that notification
I don't think notifications happen when you quote someone, you have to @ them.

I don't really know what to tell you, though; I highly doubt the PCB is counterfeit because of the silkscreen message, but if you're saying the battery's not Nintendo-branded and your rumble speaker is off, I couldn't tell you.

Shell replacements happen, I've done a few. XBC2 fake shells exist. They might've taken a real pro controller and swapped a fake XBC2 shell onto it; from there, they might've also replaced the battery and the rumble, since both of those are components that just plug in. But that's a lot of work for no real reason.

Everything will turn out okay in the end. If it's not okay, it's not the end. This, too, will pass.

Sours: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/189706-nintendo-switch/78975676

After it was discovered that Amazon India was allowing its third-party merchants to sell PSN accounts which held games like GT Sport and Red Dead Redemption 2, it turns out that the e-commerce giant may have a counterfeit problem as well. According to Redditors on the r/IndianGaming subreddit, certain Nintendo Switch Pro controllers sold on Amazon India are fake. What’s more is, it’s tough to distinguish the genuine Nintendo Switch Pro Controller from the fakes. Though the post states that fakes have a different texture and sports a shell that’s less transparent than the original in addition to having packaging of lower quality.

“Most clear indicator was that you cannot charge orignal Controller with dash cable of OnePlus, since Nintendo only allows certain cables to charge Pro Controller and Switch. This one was charging without any problem. Same trick can be used to identify original Dualshock 3 controllers which do not charge through wall chargers,” the post claims. “So be careful while buying for Pro Controller, buy it from Amzon.com or get someone to buy one for you if they’re visiting US.”

The post singles out seller Micromini for selling these units during the recently concluded Amazon Freedom Sale, warning that there may be other sellers too. We’ve reached out to Amazon for comment and will update this story if we hear from the company.

Previously we reported that Amazon India allows third-party sellers to sell PlayStation Network (PSN) accounts for use on PS4 consoles. What this means is, you can play a host of games ranging from Sekiro, Jump Force, and Gran Turismo Sport for a fraction of the cost of a digital copy via the PS Store or a disc variant. How this works is, the seller would give you the PSN credentials of an account that has the game you want to buy which you can then add to your PS4. On downloading it, you can play it on your own PSN ID.

“Providing you a digital content with a global PSN ID which will be logged in and your purchase will be downloaded/linked with your own PSN ID,” reads the description for these listings.

— Article Continues Below —

While that may be enough for some, it comes with a massive caveat: the sale of PSN accounts is against Sony’s terms of service. This could result in your console being banned from PSN.

It’s also crucial to note that multiplereports indicate that these accounts are usually acquired by means that are not entirely legal. All of this makes it a situation where if it’s too good to be true, it probably is.

For what it’s worth, Amazon India hasn’t removed these bad actors from their platform yet, making us skeptical of the company taking any action taken against what could be the latest offenders on the marketplace.

Rishi Alwani

Sours: https://themakoreactor.com/news/amazon-india-nintendo-switch-pro-controller-fake/3745/

Switch controller fake

Counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro controllers are a major problem consumers face when looking to 3rd party shops on places like eBay or Amazon. Just because the controller has Nintendo’s branding does not mean it’s real. How do you determine if your controller is fake? Read our tips on making sure your controller is real and be sure to check out our video explaining and showing more info: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3Y7B1TPOWI

At MultiShine Controllers, we aim to deliver the latest controller info to you credibly and reliably.  When we created our brand, we did so with the purpose of creating high-quality, affordable controllers that will upgrade your gameplay.  At the same time, we remain committed to bringing you controllers that are handmade and made with authentic Nintendo parts.

COUNTERFEIT NINTENDO SWITCH CONTROLLERS LOOK AND FEEL ‘OFF’

Counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro Controller

The first thing you’ll notice is the Nintendo Switch Branding. It is there and looks legit but if you notice the logo is not centered with the Smash Ball paint job. Some might think this is just poor quality from Nintendo but that is not the case. The next thing that looks off is the Smash Ball paint job itself. There are many fake controllers with very poor paint jobs but this was one of the best I’ve seen. However, if you look above the Dpad and around some of the buttons you’ll see paint worn down. This is a sign that the controller is not a Genuine Nintendo Product.

POOR QUALITY PARTS AND PACKAGING

The next thing I’d do to check your controller is to look at the packaging itself. I note in the video that the box mentions Xenoblade and the plastic wrapping around the controller is missing a bar code. You can also see from the video that the controllers plastic on the top of it over the USB-C connector is flush and has a tab over the connection button, indicating a Genuine Nintendo Product.

Do your Dpad, buttons, and triggers feel ‘sloppy’? Does it feel like it’s moving around when you shake the controller? The fakes have very bad Dpads and buttons. The buttons will feel loose but the sticks themselves will feel OEM, check for the rings around the sticks on Genuine Controllers. The fake Analog sticks will only have 1-3 rings wrapped around it whereas the Genuine controllers will have a lot more rings wrapped around.

CONNECTION LIGHTS

The connection lights under the Switch Pro should look like squares. If they are more circular you probably have a fake or 3rd party controller. I’ve highlighted the counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro controller’s connection lights. Compare them with the real one from above.

Fake Switch Pro Connection

THE MOTHERBOARD TEST

If you go to your right analog stick and move it down and shine a light inside the controller you should see the message “Thanks to all game fans!” This is a message from Nintendo. The counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro makers weren’t playing around though, they have their own message inside the controller and it says “THX4ALL GAMEFANSC — So as you can see something went wrong with their translation/copy of the text.

Here is an image from a Reddit user named c1cadaman showing the real motherboard’s message:

MultiShine Controllers Modded Controller

ARE THE COUNTERFEIT NINTENDO SWITCH PROS GOOD ENOUGH TO PLAY SMASH ULTIMATE WITH?

If you found one of these counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro controllers on eBay for a really good price, sure they’ll work for Smash Ultimate but I can’t say for how long. Looking at the parts they are cheaply made and the battery might not last as long but I’m sure you could use it for the time being. I would never recommend buying something that is claiming to be a “NINTENDO” Product and duping you out of your money. This post was made for people who might have purchased a counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro controller without realizing it. The fakes are getting good and who knows in the next year how much better they’ll get.

If you were sold a counterfeit Nintendo Switch Pro controller claiming to be real you should request a refund from the seller. Watch out for deals on eBay as most of these fakes are flooding the market, especially during the upcoming holidays.

Get better at Smash Ultimate today with custom-built Modded GameCube and Switch Pro controllers made by MultiShine Controllers

This entry was posted in Controller Guide and tagged fake controller, smash ultimate.
Sours: https://multishine.tech/collections/smash-blog/counterfeit-nintendo-switch/
The FAKE $20 Nintendo Switch Controllers

Nintendo Switch Pro Controller - Black

Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

Great product, i bought it on special for around £48 because the normal price is just way too much.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

Do yourself a favour and wait until it's on special.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

This is a must if you want to enjoy the switch on the big screen.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

Stop denying it's existence and fix it.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

D-pad is poor but for normal gameplay this is the best controller.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

Such a fuss to set up, then they loose connection and you have to re link.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

If youve never used one before its pretty much just a nintendo branded xbox controller.


Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

We bought ,not official controller first and stopped working after 6 months so we bought nintendo off8cial version this time.

Sours: https://www.fakespot.com/product/nintendo-switch-pro-controller-black

Similar news:

Fake Switch Pro Controllers – How do they compare and what’s inside?

Fake Nintendo Switch Pro Controller Comparison

Pictured above is an official Nintendo Switch Pro Controller nestled beside its counterfeit counterpart. At first glance, there isn’t much between them, stamp a logo on the fake and you’d have a hard time telling them apart. In fact, that’s exactly what happened with the Wii U Pro Controller and branded knock-offs soon flooded the market.

Bottom of fake Switch Pro Controller

Aesthetically, the bootleg controller is a near-perfect match to the original. All the buttons are in the right places, it uses similar materials, and is the same shape/size. The factory that produced these clearly had access to (or somehow cloned) the moulds used by Nintendo.

The missing logos, slightly less transparent front, and plus/minus buttons that protrude a few millimetres further are the only external differences. Thanks to the semi-transparent back you can also grab a peek at the internal battery, which bears a slightly different wrap to the original. All of which could easily be missed if you didn’t have an official controller to compare it to.

Despite their similarities, there are some major differences between the two controllers, and one of them is the price! I picked up the fake for a measly $24 (£18) on AliExpress, that’s $40 less than the official Nintendo version. Three weeks (and a short boat trip) later, the knock-off Pro Controller finally arrived at its new home. I welcomed it in with open arms, plugged in the charging cable, and placed it back outside in case it exploded.

Packaging for fake Switch Pro ControllerWhile it was charging I decided to check out the packaging. In true knock-off fashion, the fake controller came in a box reminiscent of its official counterpart. They even threw in a charging cable, which was nice. Printed on the rear of the box was a list of controller features, something I wasn’t expecting, as the seller never claimed it did any of them.

According to its box, the controller had:

  • Motion controls
  • HD rumble
  • Built-in amiibo functionality
  • and more (I still have no idea, buttons?).

The packaging also trumpeted a battery 20-hour battery life and PC compatibility. If all of these were true then I’d just hit the morally-questionable jackpot. They wouldn’t just print lies on the box, would they?

What can a fake Switch Pro Controller actually do?

Just like an official model, the knock-off emitted a little orange glow from the top LED while it charged. When it finally faded, I knew it was time to unplug the controller and find out what it could really do. At least the battery didn’t explode, which is reassuring.

Syncing & Connecting

Syncing the controller up was the first hurdle – while it does work on 5.1.0, the little sync button on the top just turns the controller off. Flipping through the flimsy manual revealed that sync mode is triggered by holding the Home + Y buttons for three seconds. Not ideal, but not a complete deal breaker either.

Fake Pro Controller paired to Switch 5.1.0

The Switch OS recognises the fake as an official Nintendo Switch Pro Controller, little icon and all. It re-connects using the Home button and has roughly the same Bluetooth range as the original controller too. The LED indicators at the bottom of the controller flash and light up correctly.

However, unlike the official controller, the knock-off has a timed standby mode built-in. While Nintendo’s Pro Controller stays connected until the console goes to sleep, the fake will automatically turn off after about 6 minutes with no input. Although this saves battery, if not used, the controller will automatically disconnect before the Nintendo Switch enters sleep mode.

When the Switch console does enter sleep mode, the fake Pro Controller isn’t able to wake the system up. Pressing the home button simply causes the indicator lights on the controller to flash sequentially. The Nintendo Switch console needs to be woken up using another method before the fake controller will reconnect. In comparison, the official Nintendo Switch Pro Controller can wake the system up from sleep mode (which is super useful).

Buttons, Triggers & Analog Sticks

Overall, the various inputs on the fake Pro Controller give Nintendo’s model a good run for the money. The ABXY buttons are slightly stiffer on the bootleg controller, while the trigger buttons are a little bit softer. There wasn’t any noticeable input lag on the Switch and if I didn’t know otherwise, I’d assume I was playing with the real deal.

Analog Stick and buttons on fake pro controller

When it comes to the analog sticks though, the difference is quite noticeable. Despite responding well, they simply aren’t as smooth as the Nintendo’s Pro Controller. There is a slight grind when circling the stick around the plastic rim and the rubber grips are a bit rougher/unrefined. The left stick was also scratched straight from the get-go.

Unfortunately, the D-pad suffers from the same design flaws as the official controller. Pressing a D-pad button and rocking lightly in another direction causes the controller to pick up the neighbouring input. I’d go as far as saying it’s slightly worse on the knock-off. A complete nightmare in games that require precise inputs.

Not-so-HD Rumble

Who’d of thunk it, the box lied. While I wasn’t expecting HD rumble, it definitely would have been a nice surprise. Instead, the fake Switch Pro Controller comes with two standard rumble motors, similar to those found under the Xbox One’s triggers.

Rumble motor in fake controller

At the risk of spoiling the teardown section – both motors are just wedged into the handles’ HD rumble compartments with bits of foam. They’re pretty noisy when they get going and vibrate quite dramatically in games like Mario Kart 8 Deluxe. The fake definitely falls short in the rumble department. Naughty box!

Motion Controls

Yes, this thing actually has motion sensors built in! After getting over the initial shock, I grabbed a bunch of compatible Switch games and began some crude testing. Switching between the two controllers in Breath of the Wild, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, and Splatoon 2; there was no noticeable difference. The bootleg’s built-in motion controls responded just as well as the genuine controller’s. Colour me impressed!

NFC (amiibo) Functionality

amiibo error code fake pro controller

While testing the motion controls in Breath of the Wild, I boldly grabbed a nearby Zelda amiibo and tapped in on the centre of the fake controller. Instead of a looted-filled chest falling from the sky, I was rewarded with a pop-up error message – “Connect a controller that can read amiibo.”

The built-in amiibo functionality was simply just another lie printed on the box.

Battery Life

I’ve played over 12 hours using the fake Pro Controller so far and the battery hasn’t been drained yet. Oddly, the controller menu in the Nintendo Switch’s OS still reports that the battery is 100% full, which simply cannot be true. I suspect that at some point the fake Pro Controller will drop from 100% to 0%, or simply just disconnect without warning.

I’ll update this article when the controller finally runs out of juice.

Steam / PC Compatibility

Hooking the fake controller up to my PC went relatively well. Using a wired connection, the controller was picked up by Windows as an Xbox controller and worked perfectly well. Motion controls are unfortunately off the table using this method though.

Switching to Bluetooth, Steam recognised the fake as an official Switch Pro Controller and allowed me to go through the usual Switch Pro Controller configuration menus. A few minutes later, I was playing Portal 2 using the controller’s built-in motion controls. Not bad for a cheap and cheerful gamepad!

What’s inside a knock-off Switch Pro Controller?

Despite the fake Switch Pro Controller looking the part, it didn’t take long to realise they’d cut some corners in the features department. So in the name of science (and pure curiosity), I decided to crack open the knock-off and see what it was made of…

Internal comparison of fake Switch Pro Controller

Given the accuracy of the shell, I was half-expecting the internals to be factory seconds of the original. However, once you see inside, it becomes immediately obvious that the fake controller isn’t the same at all. Although the PCBs are cut to fit the pro controller shape and the inputs are positioned correctly, nearly every other internal component is completely different.

Front PCB and triggers fake pro controller

Rather than neatly feeding the trigger buttons through a single flat flex cable in the front section, the fake opts for multiple garish white wires, that on one side, loops the whole way around the analog stick. The triggers are then crudely soldered directly to the front plate’s PCB. The same white wire can be found, accompanied by a dollop of glue, on the bottom corners of the main board. These are used to connect the two definitely-not-HD rumble motors, which are simply wedged in place using some foam padding.

Analog Sticks Fake Switch Pro Controller

Removing the analogue stick caps reveals that the Nintendo’s Switch Pro Controller uses two ALPS RKJXV1224005 analogue stick modules, similar to those found in PS4 controllers. The fake controller uses two unbranded modules that, despite operating the same, have some minor differences. The shafts of the fake’s sticks are made of metal instead of plastic resin. It also uses a long bar for the click functionality, in contrast, the ALPS modules use a smaller plastic block to active the click input.

Main PCB of fake switch pro controller

It’s no surprise that amiibo communication failed, in place of STMicroelectronics’ NFC controller chip, the fake simply has… nothing! That’d explain it. The knock-off controller does have Bluetooth though, albeit a completely different chip. Nintendo uses a Broadcom BCM20734UA1, the knock-off instead opts for the smaller RDA5876 Bluetooth & FM Radio Tuner from RDA Microelectronics. You still can’t listen to the radio though.

While the fake pro controller does have a motion sensor built-in, I wasn’t able to identify the actual component they were using. Nintendo’s official Switch controllers (Joy-Con too) all seem to have tiny STMicroelectronics 6-axis inertial sensors installed.

Fake controller battery board and connection

Tucked behind the main board, is a smaller PCB that connects the battery to the controller’s main PCB. The official Switch Pro Controller does this using a grey ribbon cable (containing four wires); the fake uses two thicker wires instead (positive and negative). The battery connection pins also differ, with Nintendo using three double pins and the fake using three single pins.

The battery in the fake Pro Controller is labelled up as 1300mAh, 3.7V lithium-ion battery. Although it may have the same specifications printed on it official Pro Controller battery, it certainly isn’t one. The warnings are printed on the wrong side and it lacks the Nintendo logo and CTR-003 part number (yes, the official controller uses a 3DS battery).

Pro Controller Battery Comparison

The knock-off battery weighs a few grams less than the official one and is also slightly longer (by less than a millimetre). Swapping the batteries over also showed that both the fake and genuine batteries seemed to work fine in either controller – although I wouldn’t recommend doing this. Once the knock-off battery is finally drained, I’ll be able to test its true capacity and update this article accordingly. Until then, it gets the benefit of the doubt.

Final Thoughts

The fake Pro Controller performs surprisingly well considering its low cost.  While it won’t be replacing my official one any time soon, it does make a useful backup or “Player 2” controller. Compared to an official model, the build quality isn’t quite up-to-scratch and there’s no NFC chip inside either. However, if it weren’t for the patent-infringing design, it’d make a decent third party controller.

Sours: https://www.lootpots.com/articles/fake-switch-pro-controller-comparison-internals-30072018/


170 171 172 173 174