Cheap ls camshafts

Cheap ls camshafts DEFAULT

Ask Away! with Jeff Smith: Cam Swap Tech for L LS/Vortec Engines

I’ve seen in a L LS engine story where you used a COMP short duration hydraulic roller cam and the engine made really good power. That cam, if I recall was around degrees of duration at I can buy a used LS7 cam that’s almost the same duration and would be a lot cheaper. Would this work in the L LS engine I’ve swapped in my ’74 Camaro? My engine has an Edelbrock Performer RPM dual plane intake and the MSD ignition conversion but still has the stock cam and I’m looking for more power. — K.D.

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Jeff Smith: General Motors built more L LS truck engines than any other single late model Gen III/IV engine. At cubic inches, they are a great little engine and an inexpensive way to swap an LS into an earlier car.

This is a great question since the LS7 cam specs appear to be somewhat similar to the COMP cam that we’ve used several times. While duration does play a part in this equation, it’s actually the lobe separation angle (LSA) that is the main reason the aftermarket camshaft works so well. Here’s how this all plays out.

We’ve included a COMP Cams graph that shows two large bell curves that represent the lift and duration of the exhaust lobe on the left and the intake lobe on the right. The peak of each curve represents maximum valve lift while the total width of each curve is the duration. In the middle between these two curves you can see a small triangle-shaped area. This is formed by the exhaust valve closing point as it overlaps with the opening point of the intake valve. This little triangle creates what is called valve overlap, expressed as the number of degrees when both the exhaust and intake valves are open at the same time.

Overlap is affected by two situations. The first is duration. If we increase the duration of the exhaust lobe in the graph, this creates a later closing exhaust valve and will increase overlap. Or, if we increase intake duration, this will do the same thing. Of course, the opposite is also true where reducing duration decreases the overlap.

The next big variable is the position of the intake and/or exhaust lobe centerlines. The centerline is most often placed at the peak lift position. Looking at the graph again, moving the exhaust lobe centerline to the right (retarding its position), will increase overlap. Moving the intake centerline to the left will advance the centerline position and also increase overlap.

All of these factors directly affect lobe separation and overlap. The factory LS7 cam has fairly similar duration numbers to the COMP Cams camshaft. The COMP cam offers a little more duration and lift but the real reason it works better is — as you’ve probably guessed — is because of the LSA.

Factory camshafts must always idle as smooth as possible. So in the case of both the LS7 and the LS9 camshafts, note that the LSA is in excess of degrees. As the LSA is spread apart — producing a larger LSA number — the overlap is reduced and the idle becomes increasingly smooth. Conversely, as the LSA is narrowed — to perhaps or even tighter to degrees — the idle quality will begin to become choppy, producing that unstable burble that everybody likes.

But beyond idle quality, overlap also has a profound impact of torque and horsepower. As an example, our good friend Richard Holdener just posted some data on a cam swap he performed on a L truck engine that is probably very similar to your engine. He baselined the L engine with the stock L cam and induction and a set of headers and then added the LS9 cam, which is very similar to the LS7. The good news is that he picked up an amazing 60 horsepower with this swap. His engine made a little over horsepower with just the cam swap. The horsepower gain can be directly attributed to increasing the duration from to degrees — a degree jump. Plus the valve lift improved by almost exactly inch.

Here’s the down side to that swap. In order to maintain a decent idle, you can see that the LS7 and LS9 cams with longer duration have to widen their LSA from the truck’s to as much as degrees. One issue with overlap is that decreasing the amount of time the two valves are open at the same time (widening the angle from to degrees in this case) will dramatically reduce low and midrange torque. So in Holdener’s dyno test while the engine gained 60 hp, the engine also lost more than 30 ft.-lbs. of torque below 3, rpm.

For a street-driven vehicle with an engine that is already short on displacement, that loss of torque at those lower engine speeds is not a good thing. When the engine only makes around ft.-lbs. of torque at rpm, a loss of 30 ft.-lbs. is nearly 10 percent and that makes the engine feel soggy and unresponsive. A friend tried this LS7 swap in his L pickup and changed the cam back out in a matter of weeks because it ran so poorly down low.

The reason that the LS7 engine can get away with this is that is has a much larger displacement of almost exactly cubic inches and that this engine is intended to make good horsepower while willing to sacrifice dome torque down low. But it still drives fine because of the greater displacement.

Now, if we increase the duration, improve the lift and then tighten the LSA from degrees to degrees, this adds torque down low and will improve peak torque over the stock cam while also adding horsepower at the higher engine speeds. This is why that COMP camshaft works so well. The specs are listed in that same cam spec box at the bottom — the COMP part number is .

If you’re looking for other alternatives to the COMP cam, Summit has recently introduced a line of Summit Pro LS performance hydraulic roller camshafts. The one we chose is very close to COMP’s LSR Cathedral Port cam with some minor changes. The duration at is very close to the Summit cam with almost the same LSA but delivers a little less valve lift. This way, you can use stock type LS6 valvesprings that are quite a bit less expensive than the springs that COMP recommends using. The Summit cam is also about $80 less expensive than the COMP version and you can reuse the stock retainers and locks. This might be a less expensive way to go that will deliver most of the power gain of the COMP cam. Choosing a camshaft can be very difficult unless you have all the facts, so it was a good idea to ask first before just jumping right in.

Tags: Ask Away, camshaft, camshaft tech, COMP Cams, Jeff Smith, LS cam swap, LS7, Summit Pro LS camshafts

Author: Jeff Smith Jeff Smith has had a passion for cars since he began working at his grandfather's gas station at the age After graduating from Iowa State University with a journalism degree in , he combined his two passions: cars and writing. Smith began writing for Car Craft magazine in and became editor in In , he assumed the role of editor for Hot Rod magazine before returning to his first love of writing technical stories. Since , Jeff has held various positions at Car Craft (including editor), has written books on small block Chevy performance, and even cultivated an impressive collection of and Chevelles. Now he serves as a regular contributor to OnAllCylinders.

Sours: https://www.onallcylinders.com//06/21/ask-away-with-jeff-smith-cam-swap-tech-forl-ls-vortec-engines/

By Richard Holdener/Photos By Author

We all know a cam is the go-to upgrade for any LS, but for truck guys, mild is the new wild, especially when you combine it with a cheap set of cylinder heads!

We all know that adding a cam to an LS application is the go-to method of power production. The question then becomes, how much cam do I add? Cam swaps can easily improve the power output of an otherwise-stock LS application by over hp, but are all LS owners looking for maximum power production? Let’s face it, not every LS motor is an 8,rpm, fire-breathing monster. Most, in fact, are used as daily transportation, or for hauling and/or towing. Sure, if you have a Camaro, Corvette or just swapped a turbo L into your Fox Ford, by all means go with a big stick. If, on the other hand, you happen to drive a ¾-ton Silverado, or other L-equipped car or truck, that just needs more get up and go, this test is for you. The needs of a daily driver differ greatly from a dedicated race car, or even a dual-purpose, street/strip machine. Things like low-speed torque, idle quality and converter compatibility all take precedence over maximum peak power.

Since getting big power numbers from an LS is so easy with wild cam timing, we had to purposely restrain ourselves when choosing a cam for this L test. As tempting as it was to go big, we chose our XRHR grind from COMP Cams knowing full well that the L in question would spend the majority of its time below 5, rpm. We also knew that torque at 3, rpm was every bit as important as power at 6, rpm.

What we wanted, was to improve both peak power AND peak torque production, but to do so without hurting low-speed torque. In fact, the ideal situation would be to improve torque through the entire rev range, something often difficult with a simple cam swap. Generally speaking, more aggressive cam timing often trades power at one end of the rpm range for the other. Big peak power gains come at the expense of low-speed torque, so a compromise is usually in order.

Looking for a cam that was oriented toward the daily driver, we selected an XRHR grind (pt#) from COMP Cams. The XRHR cam offered a / lift split, a /degree duration split and degree lsa. The lift numbers allowed use of factory LS3 valve springs, but we opted to install a set of valve springs from COMP Cams.

To further the gains offered by the cam upgrade, we decided to replace the factory heads on the L test motor with heads from a L. Before you get all up in arms about how the heads flow like heads and the small-valve heads would be a step-down, let’s take a look at the facts. While it is true that the heads flow slightly more than the heads, the difference in flow is minimal, and those gains are primarily at higher valve lifts. Besides, the minor flow gains required a larger intake valve, and part of the reason the heads make better power than the heads is the smaller valve. Similar flow through a smaller valve equals improved efficiency.

Of course, no discussion on the topic of cylinder heads would be complete without mentioning the combustion chambers. The most obvious answer for the superiority of the heads over the s is the smaller combustion chamber. The smaller chamber increases the static compression, which in turns improves power. Run back to back on a smaller (but hp) L, the heads were better by over 20 hp (and even more torque) over the better flowing s. According to industry experts, the chambers are not just bigger, the design is less efficient, even when milled. Besides, the heads can be had for almost nothing because everyone upgrades to something else. Given the fact that the heads are cheap, readily available and offer big power gains over the heads, we’d say they are the hot ticket for L guys looking to improve both power and fuel mileage. When teamed with a cam swap on our L, they allowed us to get both big power and torque gains without sacrificing any power down low.

To test our daily driver head and cam package, we selected a L test mule. Originally a rec-port (LS3)-headed LY6, we modified the L with the installation of an LQ4 cam, heads and a standard (non-TBSS) truck intake. This LY6/LQ4 hybrid L (LY6 pistons being the only difference) would serve as our baseline for the upgrade. Run on the dyno with long-tube headers, a factory manual throttle body and FAST XFI management system, the L produced hp at 5, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 4, rpm. After the baseline, we replaced the stock LQ4 cam with the COMP XRHR grind then swapped out the s for the heads. This combination was run with the same truck intake and throttle body. After the modifications, the L produced hp at 6, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 4, rpm. The combination of the extra torque offered by the head swap, and power offered by the cam swap, allowed the modified L to produce more power through the entire rev range than the stock version, just the thing for a daily driver.

Graph: L LQ4/LY6 Hybrid-Stock vs /COMP Upgrade

Our test motor was actually an LY6 L equipped with an LQ4 cam, then topped with a set of heads and truck intake. Run in this configuration, the hybrid L produced hp and lb-ft of torque. The torque production offered by a stock L was decent, but the power sure fell off quickly. While a cam swap can cure the horsepower deficiency, increasing the static compression with a set of heads added fuel to the fire. The combination of stock heads and a COMP XRHR cam improved both peak power and torque, from hp and lb-ft to hp and lb-ft of torque. Even more importantly, the upgrade improved torque through the entire rev range, exactly what you want in a daily driver!

CPGNationSite

Sours: https://www.cpgnation.com/lets-talk-torque-ls-truck-upgrades/
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LS/LT/LSX CAMSHAFTS AND COMPONENTS

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  • Sours: https://www.chevrolet.com/performance-parts/components/ls-lt-lsx-block-engines/camshafts-components

    Chevrolet LS Hot Cam Kit

    Product Details


    LS SERIES CAMSHAFTS
    All LS camshafts are compatible with production-style LSX and C5R blocks, as well as all of our cylinder heads – although piston-to-valve clearance must be checked on some applications. We offer a broad range of production and racing-style camshafts that are factory-engineered to deliver maximum performance when paired with our high-flow cylinder heads. Save yourself the time and expense of going to an aftermarket camshaft supplier and build your LS engine with a genuine GM cam. We’ve also got the valvetrain components you need to finish the engine, including lightweight components designed for high-rpm performance.

    • Hot Cam Kit
    • Duration @ " Lift( Deg): Intake:  / Exhaust: 
    • Maximum Lift (in) W/ Rocker: Intake:  / Exhaust:
    • Lobe Centerline ( deg): 
    • Technical Notes: Kit includes 16 LS6 valve springs retainers

    WarningCalifornia Proposition 65 Warning

    Sours: https://www.gmperformancemotor.com/mm5/

    Ls camshafts cheap

    70hp L LS Isky Cam Swap

    | How-To - Engine and Drivetrain

    We hear the whiners all the time: "Everybody runs those stupid LS engines. They're boring!" We'll admit LS engines are less than visually inspiring; there's a good reason these engines are popular. Show us another engine that will deliver 70 hp with a simple cam swap! Keep looking we'll wait. Here's the push we started with a $ craigslist L iron truck motor We added a mild Isky cam, valvesprings, and lifters and added 70 big ones. It was too easy.

    Our dyno victim started life as a LM7 L motor ( ci) and is among the most prevalent LS engines on the planet. GM has built millions of them. Factory specs for this engine with its truck EFI is hp and lb-ft of torque, which is pretty good for essentially a small-bore ( inch), long-stroke ( inch) version of the traditional Chevy

    Because we were crunched for time, we didn't baseline our engine with an Edelbrock Performer RPM dual plane intake and /4-inch American Racing headers, but the guys at CLASSIS TRUCKS did with an identical L motor that made hp and lb-ft of torque. This is representative of that configuration so we used these numbers for our baseline a solid 30hp gain over the stock production specs.

    Because the cylinder heads on these LS engines produce much better flow numbers than those stock mid-'60s small-block Chevy heads, these late-model engines respond wonderfully to even a mild camshaft upgrade. We decided to give Isky a shot at the cam specs for our little L. Isky offers a raft of LS hydraulic roller cams in the catalog so we chose one with / degrees of duration at (see Cam Specs Chart).

    Isky offers much bigger cams with more lift and duration but we exercised restraint for several reasons. This is both a smaller displacement engine and is also intended for near-daily summertime street fun. We didn't want some Pro Stock-sounding staccato idle that would ruin the driveability especially because we intend to pair this engine with an overdrive automatic and a lockup converter in an early '50s Chevy pickup. These parameters narrowed our selection to this midrange cam that offered shorter duration combined with a degree lobe separation angle (LSA) compared to the stock cam's degree angle.

    LSA is an often-tossed about cam spec that can be somewhat confusing so it's worth closer inspection. The term refers to the number of cam degrees between the intake and exhaust lobe centerlines. The larger the LSA number, the more degrees between the lobes, which results in less valve overlap between exhaust valve closing and intake valve opening. All production LS cams use a very wide LSA to improve idle quality. Decreasing the overlap improves idle vacuum and contributes to a very smooth idle. If we add duration with the same LSA, this increases overlap. So our new cam does add overlap both with more duration on the intake and exhaust and also because the Isky cam's LSA is 3 degrees tighter, versus degrees.

    We talked with Isky's Nolan Jamora and he suggested we also test their new line of EZ-Roll hydraulic roller lifters fitted with bushings instead of the more common needle roller bearings. Isky was one of the first cam companies to address the issue of roller lifter needle bearing failures that seemed to especially plague big-block Chevys with mechanical roller cams and high spring pressures.

    Isky's solution replaces the tiny roller bearings with a proprietary bushing material that radically increases the bearing surface area. Isky credits this lifter with what they call the Big-Foot Effect where load distribution is increased by over percent compared to needle bearings. Of greater import is the notion that the bushing virtually eliminates the classic roller lifter failure that scatters dozens of tiny needle bearings inside the engine where they usually cause terminal engine damage. It's worth noting that the preponderance of problems with roller lifter failures has been with mechanical roller lifters and less so with their hydraulic cousins. We asked Jamora about durability of the softer bushing material and he said that with proper maintenance and oil changes that the company contends the lifter can easily go , miles.

    Along with the EZ-Roll hydraulic roller bushing lifters is a matching set of beehive Isky valvesprings, retainers, locks, seat inserts, and a custom set of inch wall thickness pushrods. The pushrod length for our engine ended up being inch long to compensate for the height of the Isky lifters. Given the net lash design of the LS engine, a different height pushrod seat in the lifter demands a change in pushrod length to retain the proper lifter preload. These pushrods were inch longer than stock.

    Swapping parts was not difficult, but because we were going to change lifters, this is one place where LS engine heads have to be removed where the small-block Chevy does not. Normally, if all we were going to do was swap the cam in this LS engine and reuse the factory lifters, this would be a snap. All you do is remove the pushrods and then roll the engine a couple of revolutions. The cam will push the lifters up into the guides and hold the lifters up off the cam so that the cam can be easily removed.

    Because we were using the Isky lifters with built-in retainer bars, we removed the plastic lifter guides and once the cam was installed, the new lifters dropped right in place. We also degreed the cam and then buttoned the engine up with an Edelbrock Performer RPM intake and topped it off with a Holley cfm HP carburetor. With all that done, we were ready for testing.

    With the engine bolted up on the SuperFlow dyno at Westech, we used a set of /8-inch American Racing headers without mufflers for this quickie test. Once we fired up our engine using the Edelbrock/MSD timing module to control the spark, we did some quick tuning on the carburetor and fiddled with the timing. All this took less than an hour to come up with a peak horsepower of at 6, and lb-ft torque at 3, rpm. This represents a dramatic 70hp improvement over the stock cam. Even better, the factory L motor makes peak torque at 4, but with the Edelbrock dual plane, headers, and a bigger cam, peak torque happened at 3, rpm! This broadened the rpm spread between peak torque at 3, and peak horsepower at 6, to an amazing 2, rpm. Most engines generate a much narrower range of around 1, rpm. So for the street, this is a great combination.

    In the final tally, we now have a smart little L street motor making nearly hp that idles at 13 inches of manifold vacuum and with a little bit of part-throttle carb tuning, our modern-day could conceivably deliver decent fuel mileage; assuming you can keep your foot out the throttle! That sounds like a very successful street engine and all with a simple cam swap.

    Install a cam and make 70 hp. It doesn't get much easier than doing this on an LS engine.

    Our swap involves replacing the stock valvetrain with a mild Isky hydraulic roller, new lifters, beehive valvesprings, retainers, locks, and stronger pushrods. The valvesprings increase load but are still of the factory beehive configuration.

    After pulling the balancer, we also removed the front timing cover. If you do not plan on replacing timing chain and gear or the engine already has a new set (like ours), then it's not necessary to remove the oil pump. We removed the pump to offer a better view of the zero mark on the crank gear. This eventually required removing the pan to get the pump back on.

    We won't go through the entire cam install sequence since that's been covered before. However, since we were replacing the factory rollers with new Isky EZ-Roll lifters, we removed the heads and then the stock plastic guides and lifters and replaced them with the Isky pieces.

    Once the cam and timing set were back in place, we degreed the package just to make sure it was installed correctly. We moved the cam with the Cloyes Hex-A-Just until we had the intake closing point at exactly on the spec. Intake closing is the most important of all the cam timing specs.

    If you remove the oil pump, we learned this install trick from Kenny Duttweiler. Lightly bolt the pump in place and turn the engine over by hand roughly four to six cycles. The pump rotor will seek the proper clearance and then you can torque the outer four bolts. It's that easy.

    We also added a new Fel-Pro MLS head gasket to ensure a solid seal. We used ARP head studs but they aren't essential for a typical street engine.

    While the heads were removed, we yanked the stock original springs and replaced them with a set of Isky beehive springs with much more seat and open pressure.

    Induction bolt-ons consisted of an Edelbrock Performer RPM carbureted dual plane intake, ARP intake fasteners and a Holley cfm HP carburetor. We were now ready for the dyno.

    After adding the Holley pan, we also upgraded to AMSOIL INC. Extended Life 5W synthetic oil and a new AMSOIL INC. oil filter.

    We slapped our liter on Westech's dyno, Steve Brule' pulled the handle, and after a few minor tuning tweaks, we made hp and lb-ft of torque a solid 70hp gain!

    Chart 01
    Cam Specs

    CamshaftAdv. DurationDur. at Valve LiftLSA
    Stock LM7 IntakeN/A
    Stock LM7 ExhN/A
    Isky Intake
    Isky Exhaust

    Power Curve

    RPMTQHP
    3,
    3,
    3,
    3,
    3,
    4,
    4,
    4,
    4,
    4,
    5,
    5,
    5,
    5,
    5,
    6,
    6,
    DescriptionPNSourcePrice
    Isky hyd. roller camshaftIskyCall
    Isky HPx EZ-Roll bushing liftersHYRTIsky$1,
    Isky valvesprings, beehiveASummit Racing$
    Isky retainers, beehiveSTSummit Racing$
    Isky valve locksVLIsky$
    Isky valvespring locatorsVSLSummit Racing$
    Isky pushrodsCallSummit Racing$
    Cloyes adjustable three-bolt timing setASummit Racing$
    Fel-Pro MLS head gasket for L (2)PTSummit Racing$
    Fel-Pro intake gasketSummit Racing$
    Edelbrock Performer RPM dual planeSummit Racing$
    Edelbrock RPM and ignition moduleSummit Racing$
    Holley cfm HP carburetorSummit Racing$
    American Racing HeadersCallAm. Racing$1,
    Holley LS oil panSummit Racing$
    AMSOIL INC. Extended Life 5W, (6 qts)XLFQTAMSOIL$ ea.
    AMSOIL INC. oil filterEA15K50AMSOIL$
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    HOW TO PICK: THE RIGHT JUNKYARD 6.0L LS CAM. 4 CAMS-WHAT WORKS BEST?

    Dyno Tested: Add 60HP to a Junkyard L LS for Just $

    | How-To - Engine and Drivetrain

    Get 60 HP more from a L LS with a used LS9 cam and LS3 valvesprings.

    What kind of new math is add 9 to your 7, but don't forget to carry the 3? Well, it's the kind of new LS math where you add 60 horsepower to your junkyard L for the paltry sum of just $ Interested, now? We thought so! Now we all know the LS is still the hottest thing going in the performance industry, and that nothing wakes up an LS like a cam swap, right?

    Related: How to Perform an LS Engine Swap: Tips and Tricks

    The problem with a cam swap, like anything else we want to do with our car, is the expense. While the installation of a typical aftermarket cam is money well spent, and represents one heck of a performance bargain, who among us isn't looking to save a few bucks here and there? That is what this test is all about.

    While a cam and springs can easily set you back over $, what if we told you there was a way to get plenty of performance for a fraction of that price? You heard it right, we managed to coax an extra 60 horsepower from a freshly scored junkyard L with a cam and springs for a measly Benjamin. Of course, our components were used, but by no means were they special deals, since we saw plenty offered near this price point.

    The key to the $ cam swap was choosing the right cam, followed by the right springs. While an aftermarket cam might well offer even bigger power gains, the cost per horsepower definitely favors this low-buck route. If you are looking to get more performance from your L, don't look to the aftermarket, look back at the factory, namely the LS9. Why install an LS9 cam designed for a supercharged L into our naturally aspirated L, you ask? A quick look at the specs of the two cams will reveal the power potential.

    The factory LM7 L cam, a profile shared with the smaller L LR4, was the mildest cam ever offered by the factory. With specs of / lift, /degree duration, and LSA, the L stick was hardly what you could consider a power house. By contrast, the LS9 cam offered a / lift split, a /degree duration split, and (wide) degree LSA. Though designed for a positive displacement blower, in a larger motor no less, the GM cam offered a lot of performance when stuffed into the smaller L. Case in point, the cam swap increased the engine speed where the motor made peak power by almost 1, rpm! On the smaller L, the LS9 cam definitely wanted to rev.

    If you perform a search for LS cams, chances are the least expensive cam to come up (even new) will be the LS9. GM still offers the popular cam near $ brand new, but since so many LS9 owners have upgraded their cams, there are plenty of used versions available through forums, groups, and eBay. In the interest of full disclosure, it should be pointed out that the factory LS9 cam did not feature a rear cam sensor, and would therefore require a change in not only the cam gear (to a 1x if Gen 3), but also the front cover and associated cam sensor. Our L was run with an aftermarket Holley HP ECU and required no such change, but that would certainly bring the price up. It might also have us thinking about the more expensive LS6 cams.

    The factory LS3 cam is a good choice, as it offers better low-speed power compared to the LS9, but slightly less power on the big end. It does, however, require the same kind of upgrades as the LS9, meaning the front cover, cam sprocket, and sensor. In terms of valve springs, all of the cams mentioned (including the LS9) can be run with cheap, used factory LS3 springs. We nabbed a set of used take-offs for $ When combined with the $70 used LS9 cam (the LS7 cam offers identical performance when run with the LM7 rockers), our total expenditure for the cam swap was a cool $!

    Now that we have covered the reason for our purchase and the associated costs, let's take a look at the results. Fresh from the junkyard, our L LM7 test motor was covered with over K miles worth of grease and grime. It is amazing how well these things run with so many miles, especially after we saw the condition of a couple of the cam lobes. No longer smooth and shiny, the lobes were nonetheless intact and thanks to working roller lifters, offered not only a smooth idle but plenty of (stock level) performance. Run on the dyno with the stock cam, long-tube headers, and no accessories, the L produced hp at 5, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 3, rpm.

    After installation of the LS9 cam and LS3 springs, the power output jumped to hp at 6, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 4, rpm. The LS9 cam sure offered plenty of extra power on the big end, but take a note of the torque loss down low, especially for you truck guys. Looking at the curve, you might be wondering why we would pick a blower cam, even one that costs just $, with so much emphasis on the top of the rev range? To find out, you'll have to check back with us next time when we install a Vortech supercharger on this bad boy!

    On The Dyno:

    $ Cam Swap

    What can you get for $ these days? How about an extra 60 hp from a cam swap? For this test, we upgraded the stock LM7 cam and springs with an LS9 cam and LS3 valve springs. The used take-offs are available from a variety of sources; we got both of ours for an even $ ($70 for the cam and $30 for the springs). Equipped with the stock cam, the well-used, junkyard L produced hp at 5, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 3, rpm. After installation of the LS9 cam and LS3 springs, the power output jumped to hp at 6, rpm and lb-ft of torque at 4, rpm.

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