Ds game cartridge

Ds game cartridge DEFAULT

Don't be fooled by counterfeit imitations when completing your game library.

Bootleg games are illegal copies of legitimate games. There are four quick and easy ways to spot if a Nintendo DS cartridge is a bootleg. If suspicious, check multiple items – not all bootlegs will have the same flaws.

#1 – Cartridge won't boot in a Nintendo DSi unit:

As the newest version of the DS system on the market, the Nintendo DSi includes a newer version of the operating system from the manufacturer that does a better job at detecting bootleg software and rejecting it with an error message. After launching the game, you'll see the message below displayed on the bottom screen.

Non-booting DS screen

Power down the system, remove the cartridge and re-insert it. Power the system back on and try to launch the game. If you receive this error again, it's very likely you have a bootleg game.


#2 – Cartridge Construction is of low quality:

Two things you can quickly check without having a Nintendo DSi handy is the quality of the cartridge's construction. First, with any Nintendo DS cartridge you'll notice a seam down the middle of the side. If you tug on this with a fingernail, the cartridge should not separate at all. If it does, you've got a bootleg.

Back of cartridge

Second, look at the back of the cartridge. Here, you see a bootleg cartridge on the left and a real cartridge on the right. Inside the Nintendo Racetrack logo, you'll notice that outlined in blue, the real cartridge has the registered trademark logo ® after the word "Nintendo". This is missing from the bootleg. Also, above the gold contact points, there are white letters and numbers. While the letters in this picture say "Nintendo", not all cartridges will – but all legitimate cartridges will have white letters above these gold contact points.


#3 - Matching the Serial Numbers:

Each published title has a serial number unique to itself. This serial number can be found on the front of the cartridge and on the back of the game case, next to the UPC. On the cartridge, you''ll find the serial number in the format of NTR-XXXX-YYY, where XXXX is the unique serial number for that game, and YYY represents the region, such as USA.

Serial numbers

On the back of the game case, you''ll find the serial number again, in the format of NTR-P-XXXX, again where XXXX is the unique serial number. These two serial numbers will always match on a legitimate copy of the game. Also, compare this serial number to the string of letters printed in black on the back of the cartridge. The first four letters on the back will always match this serial number as well.


#4 – The Case of the Odd Case:

There are three types of DS Game Cases. The standard US case is black and has a slot for holding Game Boy Advance games that is solid. Newer "eco-friendly" DS cases have no GBA slot and feature a cut-out recycling symbol behind the manual. The Japanese case is black and has a slot for holding Game Boy Advance games that is in three pieces. The European case is clear and thicker, to accommodate game manuals in multiple languages. Games sold in the US are NEVER sold in the European style cases and rarely ever sold in the Japanese style cases. While there are a few exceptions to the Japanese cases, if you spot a US game in a Japanese case, it should draw your attention to look at the game itself more closely.

European vs. US case

Japanese vs. US case

New style US case

In the photo on the left, you'll see a European-style DS case on the left side and a US-style DS case on the right side. In the photo on the right, you'll see a Japanese-style DS case on the left side and a US-style DS case on the right side.

You can find further information about Nintendo's Anti-Piracy program on the official website. There are tips on how to identify counterfeit software for all consoles, not just the DS family, and photos for each category too.

Sours: http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/feature/25041/quick-and-easy-ways-to-spot-a-bootleg-nintendo-ds-game

15 Rarest Nintendo DS Games (& How Much They’re Worth)

The Nintendo DS was originally released in 2004 and set itself apart from other handheld consoles at the time thanks to the two different screens that are on the console. The console has a hinge in the center and there's one screen on each half, the bottom of which is a touch screen. Since the DS was released, it's launched an entire family of handheld consoles.

Related: Nintendo DS: The 10 Best-Selling Games Of All Time

Following the release of the Nintendo DS, Nintendo went on to create more variations of the console, each with different improvements and new features. New consoles like the Nintendo DSi, Nintendo DS Lite, Nintendo 2DS, and Nintendo 3DS have hit the market and all become super popular. Just like the consoles got really popular, some of the rare games on these consoles have, too.

Updated on March 6, 2021 by Jessica Thomas:It's been quite some time since the Nintendo DS was being sold in stores. Some of the consoles games have made there way to other consoles by the e-Shop or through remakes. Since the DS was so popular though, it would be impossible to see every game readily avalible. In fact, Ds games are becoming somewhat rare, as they are getting harder and harder to fine. Even the boxed version of the games are now in short supply after years of companies discarding the packaging to make storage easier, and cartridge boxes being thrown away over the course of owners moving around. Below are some of the rarest DS games that you can buy.

15 Jewel Time Deluxe ($99)

Considering some of the other games that are on this list, it seems a little unusual that a jewel-matching puzzle game would make a list of the rarest and most expensive games on the Nintendo DS. But, this game is hard to find and the price has definitely risen a lot since it was released in 2011.

This game is similar to other puzzle games of the same nature. Players have to swap the gems on the screen to make rows of three or more to score points in a certain amount of time. This rare game may be simple, but it'll still cost you $99 for a new copy.

14 Magician's Quest: Mysterious Times ($99)

Magician's Quest: Mysterious Times is a game that was released on the Nintendo DS in 2008 in Japan and in 2009 in the rest of the world. This game is a magical life simulation game that has the player control a character who is attending a magic academy. The player builds relationships with the NPCs in the game while learning spells and everything they need to know about magic.

Many fans have pointed out how similar this game is to the Animal Crossing franchise, a series that had two games released on the different Nintendo DS consoles. Unlike the Animal Crossing games, this game has become fairly rare. Getting a new and complete copy can cost up to $99.

13 Pokémon SoulSilver Version ($104)

Pokémon SoulSilver Version was released in 2009 as an enhanced remake of the 1999 game Pokémon Silver. The game is set in the Johto region and is part of the fourth generation of the Pokémon franchise. This game was released alongside Pokémon HeartGold and took the original Generation IV games and added some features from Pokémon Crystal.

Because this game was released in 2009 and is an enhanced port of a game from the late 1990s, there's no way it costs much today, right? Wrong. As any Pokémon fan will know, these games get really collectible for major fans. A new and complete copy of this game will set a Pokémon collector back $104.

12 Mega Man Star Force 3: Red Joker ($109)

Mega Man Star Force 3 was published in 2009 in two versions — Black Ace and Red Joker — with Red Joker being a bit on the rarer side. In this action RPG, players control Geo Stelar, a young boy who can manipulate electromagnetic waves to become Mega Man. The hero is enlisted to fight a crime syndicate named Dealer.

Although Capcom's Mega Man series was wildly popular, they did not release a ton of copies of the franchise's Star Force spin-off. If you are lucky enough to come across a copy, you will likely pay an average of $109.

11 Dragon Quest VI: Realms Of Revelation ($133)

Heartbeat and Enix's Dragon Quest VI was initially released on the Super Famicom, but a remake of the title hit the DS in 2011. The first-person RPG follows "heroes" who have amnesia as they try to save both a Dream World and a Real World from boss monsters. The game received positive reviews and comparisons to titles like Final Fantasy V and The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.

RELATED: 10 Hidden Gems On The Nintendo DS and 3DS

Not many copies of the game can be found in North America, but because it's so popular, it's highly sought-after. Those who wish to buy a copy will have to pay up to $133.

10 Pokémon Distribution Cartridges ($139)

These are technically not games, but they are cartridges that were released for the Nintendo DS and they're majorly collectible today because of how unique they are. And being so collectible and interesting has made the price of these cartridges skyrocket.

These are called distribution devices. They're cartridges that are sent out to stores in order to promote special events. Typically, they'll give anyone who visits the store with their console a special Pokémon, normally one that isn't available outside of that event. Most of them were destroyed and no cartridges were made after Generation V, making these super rare. Among the most expensive is the Zoroark cartridge that costs $139.

9 Pokémon HeartGold Version (Pokéwalker Bundle) ($143)

While the prices of many games drop as they get older and older, the Pokémon games just seem to get more expensive. Some games, like High School Musical: Makin' the Cut can be picked up for only a couple dollars, but even getting a loose cartridge of some of the Pokémon games can cost as much as a new, modern game.

Related: 10 Reasons Why HeartGold And SoulSilver Are The Best Pokémon Games

For instance, this special version of Pokémon HeartGold that came bundled with a special step tracker called a Pokéwalker has gotten really rare and became a collectible for major fans of the Pokémon franchise. To get a complete copy now, you'll have to pay up to $143.

8 Commando: Steel Disaster ($170)

Mana Computer Software's run and gun title Commando: Steel Disaster has players controlling an operative who is on a mission to stop a militant organization. There are five stages filled with gunplay in 2-D. In each stage, players must collect weapons and ammunition in order to survive until the final boss.

Commando: Steel Disaster was released as a DSiWare title with few copies available. A brand new copy sells for about $170 today.

7 Dokapon Journey ($179)

Dokapon Journey was initially released in Japan in 2008, with Atlus later publishing in North America in 2009. The party RPG sees a desperate King offering his daughter, Princess Penny, to anyone who can save his kingdom. It combines turn-based combat and adventure with a competitive board game. It's a bit like Mario Party, but with more at stake.

Related: Ranking The 10 Best Nintendo DS Role-Playing Games

Dokapon Journey didn't make it across all regions of North America, so it's a bit harder to find a copy today. Those who do snag one will pay up to $179.

6 Pokemon Platinum ($183)

Pokemon Platinum was the defensive version of the Sinnoh region games. While Sinnoh may not have been as packed on completely new designs as other regions, it did introduce evolutions for several different gen I Pokemon. This included fan favorites like Electrobuzz and Magneton.

A remake of the generation was recently announced for switch, which is making the demand for this game rise to $183.

5 Solatorobo: Red The Hunter ($235)

Solatorobo: Red the Hunter was released on the Nintendo DS in 2010 in Japan and 2011 in the rest of the world. This game is an action-RPG that is set in a fantasy world with heavy steampunk elements known. Anthropomorphic animals known as Caninu and Felineko live all over Caninu and the player controls one of them, a dog known as Red Savarin who is tasked with tracking down a file that was stolen.

This game became fairly popular when it was released among fantasy and RPG fans. Despite being popular among Nintendo DS owners, it's still become a fairly rare game in more recent years. To get a new and complete copy of this game, you'll have to pay $235.

4 PowerBike ($229)

Powerbike is a motocross game with eight unique tracks. It's story follows a character who gets an offer from a mysterious sponsor. Taking the offer, they are thrown into the world of racing and must speed their way to the top. There is even a local multiplayer mode to play with friends.

The game also incorporated jumps and its $229 price tag may be related to its similarities to the NES classic Excitebike.

3 Little Red Riding Hood's Zombie BBQ ($241)

A classic children's tale character takes on an interesting role in Little Red Hiding Hood's Zombie BBQ, an action rail shooter from 2008. Little Red must take on an army of zombies using various high-powered guns. In this game, there's only shooting and dodging, but this becomes increasingly difficult as it progresses.

The game was only physically released in North America. In Europe, it was published as a DSiWare title, but no other region saw its release. It can be found online for an average new price of $241.

2 Shepherd's Crossing 2 ($349)

Shepherd's Crossing 2 is a sequel to the PlayStation 2 game Shepherd's Crossing. This life simulation game is similar to other games like Stardew Valley and Harvest Moon, in that it has the player running a farm and focuses on the management of that farm. Unlike those two games, this one focuses more on trading and the economic management of the farm than having a relationship with an NPC.

This game was released in 2010 on the Nintendo DS and has become one of the rarest games on the console. In order to get a new and complete copy, you'll have to pay up to $349.

1 The Legend Of Zelda: Twilight Princess Demo ($465)

One thing not even the most dedicated Legend of Zelda fans know is the fact that The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was on the Nintendo DS... Kind of. The sequel, The Phantom Hourglass, was released on the handheld console, but that's not what we mean.

This cartridge was released in 2004 at E3 and shows nothing more than a trailer of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, a game that was released on the Nintendo GameCube and Nintendo Wii. Only around 500 were made and they were only given out to the press at E3 2004, before the Nintendo DS was even released. In order to get one of these rare cartridges, you'll have to pay $465.

Next: Zelda: 10 Ways That Twilight Princess References Ocarina Of Time (That You Didn’t Notice)

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A Nintendo game card (trademarked as Game Card) is a cartridge-based format used to physically distribute video games for certain Nintendo systems. The game cards resemble smaller, thinner versions of the Game Pak cartridges for previous portable gaming consoles released by Nintendo, such as the Game Boy and Game Boy Advance.[1] The mask ROM chips are manufactured by Macronix and have an access speed of 150 ns.[2] The cards contain flash memory,[citation needed] including game data, and a writable portion for saving user data for Nintendo DS and Nintendo 3DS titles.

Nintendo DS[]

Nintendo DS Game Card[]

Cards for the Nintendo DS ranged from 64 megabits to 4 gigabits (8–512 MB) in capacity[3][4] The cards contain an integrated flash memory and an EEPROM to save user data such as game progress or high scores. However, there are a small number of games that have no save memory such as Electroplankton.

Based on an IGN blog by the developer of MechAssault: Phantom War, larger (such as 128 MB) cards have a 25% slower data transfer rate than the more common smaller (such as 64 MB) cards; however, the specific base rate was not mentioned.[5]

Nintendo DSi Game Card[]

In 2008, the Nintendo DSi was launched. The console offered various hardware improvements and additional functions over previous Nintendo DS iterations, such as the inclusion of cameras. While many Nintendo DS titles released afterwards included features that enhanced gameplay when played on the Nintendo DSi console, most of these games retained compatibility with the original DS iterations sans enhanced features. However, a select few retail game titles were released that worked exclusively for the Nintendo DSi consoles for reasons such as requiring camera functions, and these titles have game cards with white-colored casings (all DSi-exclusive games are region locked). Examples of such game cards include Picture Perfect Hair Salon. While these white game cards can be physically inserted into original Nintendo DS consoles, their software did not function due to the missing hardware features. These DSi-exclusive game cards are fully compatible with the Nintendo 3DS family.

Prior to the release of the Nintendo DSi, Nintendo encouraged developers to release DSi-exclusive games as DSiWare downloadables instead of retail game cards that would not function on older Nintendo DS consoles.[6]

Infrared support[]

Despite all iterations of the Nintendo DS line lacking native infrared support, certain titles made use of this type of communication function using game cards with their own infrared transceivers. These game cards are generally glossier and darker than common Nintendo DS game cards, and reveal their translucency when exposed to light. Examples of such game cards include Personal Trainer: Walking, which connect to the included pedometers, Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, which connect to the included Pokéwalker accessory, and Pokémon Black and White and Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, which connect to other games.[citation needed]


Although all iterations of the Nintendo 3DS family support native infrared functions, Nintendo DS games still use the infrared-enabled game cards themselves when played on a 3DS system, reserving the native infrared for Nintendo 3DS-specific software.[citation needed]

Nintendo 3DS[]

Game cards for the Nintendo 3DS are from 1 to 8 gigabytes in size,[7] with 2 GB of game data at launch.[8] They look very similar to DS Game Cards, but are incompatible and have a small tab on one side to prevent them from being inserted into a DS.[9] However, R4 flash cartridges designed for the 3DS still incorporate the same design as the original DS game card.

Newer flash cartridges for the 3DS, such as the Gateway or Sky3DS, uses the 3DS card design.

Nintendo Switch[]

The Nintendo Switch uses cartridges that are officially called Game Card. This iteration is smaller and has a larger storage capacity than its previous versions.[10] Despite its similarities, the Switch is not compatible with DS and 3DS cards.[11] The game cards used in the Switch are non-writable and save data is stored in the console's internal memory, unlike the DS and 3DS's game cards, which are writable and are able to store save data.[12]

Due to their size, the Game Cards are coated with denatonium benzoate, a non-toxic, bitter-tasting agent, as a safety precaution against accidental consumption by young children.[13] Videos of users intentionally tasting the cartridges became a meme prior to the console's launch, which originated from Jeff Gerstmann's actions on a Giant Bomb webcast.[14][15]

The cartridges come in a variety of capacities: 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB, 8GB, 16 GB and 32 GB.[16] 64 GB cartridges were planned to be introduced in the second half of 2018, but due to unspecified circumstances, Nintendo delayed the launch of this variant to 2019.[17]

References[]

  1. Vuijk, Rafael (11 October 2006). "First Nintendo DS cartridge information". Dark Fader (Rafael Vuijk). Retrieved 10 February 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Nintendo: NDS Disassembly". GainGame's Blog. Archived from the original on 25 February 2010. Retrieved 10 February 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Ni no Kuni was the first DS game to use a 4-gigabit card "GoNintendo: Level 5's press conference - massive info roundup (Fantasy Life announced, Ninokuni's massive DS cart, and much more!)".<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Adam Riley (15 July 2007). "E3 2007 News - Archaic Sealed Heat (Nintendo DS) RPG Details". Cubed³. Retrieved 4 November 2007.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Sara Guinness (16 June 2006). "MechAssault DS Developer Diary". IGN. Retrieved 9 April 2015.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  6. Craig Harris (25 March 2009). "GDC 09: DSi Hybrid, Exclusive Carts Soon". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. Archived from the original on 27 March 2009. Retrieved 23 June 2010.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  7. Yeung, Karlie (17 December 2010). "3DS Cartridges Could Store Up to 8GB". Nintendo World Report. Retrieved 31 January 2012. <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  8. Pereira, Chris (21 June 2010). "A Look at the New Nintendo 3DS Game Cards". 1UP.com. UGO Entertainment. Archived from the original on 30 May 2012. Retrieved 20 November 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  9. "Nintendo 3DS Game Cards Look Like This". Siliconera. 18 June 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2012.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  10. "Nintendo Switch will use cartridges". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved 20 October 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  11. Arnold, Cory (21 October 2016). "Nintendo Switch not compatible with physical 3DS or Wii U games". Destructoid. Retrieved 21 October 2016.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. Schreier, Jason (20 January 2017). "Nintendo Answers (And Avoids) Our Switch Questions". Kotaku. Retrieved 20 January 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles> "Nintendo Switch game cards are non-writable; game save data is stored in internal NAND memory."
  13. Dornbush, Johnathon (2 March 2017). "Nintendo Switch Cartridges Taste Terrible". IGN. Retrieved 3 March 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  14. "Nintendo Switch cartridges 'taste so bad'". BBC News. Retrieved 7 March 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  15. "New trend: Putting disgusting Nintendo Switch cartridges in your mouth". The Daily Dot. Retrieved 7 March 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  16. Yin-Poole, Wesley (13 March 2017). "Why Nintendo Switch games are ending up more expensive". Retrieved 13 March 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  17. Mochizuki, Takashi (December 27, 2017). "Nintendo Delays Rollout of 64-Gigabyte Switch Game Cards Until 2019". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved December 27, 2017.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
Sours: https://ultimatepopculture.fandom.com/wiki/Nintendo_game_card

Nintendo game card

Game cartridge used on some Nintendo video game consoles

A Nintendo game card (trademarked as Game Card) is a flash storage-based format used to physically distribute video games for certain Nintendo systems. The game cards resemble both smaller and thinner versions of Hudson's HuCard, the storage medium for the PC-Engine, and the Game PakROM cartridges used for previous portable gaming consoles released by Nintendo, such as the Game Boy and Game Boy Advance.[1] The mask ROM chips are manufactured by Macronix and have an access speed of 150 ns.[2]

Nintendo DS[edit]

Nintendo DS Game Card[edit]

Cards for the Nintendo DS ranged from 64 megabits to 4 gigabits (8–512 MB) in capacity[3][4] The cards contain an integrated flash memory for game data and an EEPROM to save user data such as game progress or high scores. However, there are a small number of games that have no save memory such as Electroplankton.

According to an IGN blog by Backbone Entertainment, the developer of MechAssault: Phantom War, larger (such as 128 MB) cards have a 25% slower data transfer rate than the more common smaller (such as 64 MB) cards; however, the specific base rate was not mentioned.[5]

Nintendo DSi Game Card[edit]

In 2008, the Nintendo DSi was launched. The console offered various hardware improvements and additional functions over previous Nintendo DS iterations, such as the inclusion of cameras. While many Nintendo DS titles released afterwards included features that enhanced gameplay when played on the Nintendo DSi console, most of these games retained compatibility with the original DS iterations. However, a select few retail game titles were released that worked exclusively for the Nintendo DSi consoles for reasons such as requiring camera functions, and these titles have game cards with white-colored casings (all DSi-exclusive games are region locked). Examples of such game cards include Picture Perfect Hair Salon. While these white game cards can be physically inserted into original Nintendo DS consoles, their software did not function due to the missing hardware features. These DSi-exclusive game cards are fully compatible with the Nintendo 3DS family.

Prior to the release of the Nintendo DSi, Nintendo encouraged developers to release DSi-exclusive games as DSiWare downloadables instead of retail game cards that would not function on older Nintendo DS consoles.[6]

Infrared support[edit]

Pokémon Black Version cartridge.

Despite all iterations of the Nintendo DS line lacking native infrared support, certain titles made use of this type of communication function using game cards with their own infrared transceivers. These game cards are generally glossier and darker than common Nintendo DS game cards, and reveal their translucency when exposed to light. Examples of such game cards include Personal Trainer: Walking and Active Health WithCarol Vorderman, which connect to the included pedometers, Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, which connect to the included Pokéwalker accessory,[7] and Pokémon Black and White and Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, which connect DS systems facing each other.[8][9]

Although all iterations of the Nintendo 3DS family support native infrared functions, Nintendo DS games still use the infrared-enabled game cards themselves when played on a 3DS system, reserving the native infrared for Nintendo 3DS-specific software.[citation needed]

Nintendo 3DS[edit]

Game cards for the Nintendo 3DS are from 1 to 8 gigabytes in size,[10] with 2 GB of game data at launch.[11] They look very similar to DS Game Cards, but are incompatible and have a small tab on one side to prevent them from being inserted into a DS, DS lite, or a DSi.[12]

Nintendo Switch[edit]

The Nintendo Switch uses cartridges that are officially called Game Card. This iteration is smaller and has a larger storage capacity than its previous versions.[13] Despite its similarities, the Switch is not compatible with DS and 3DS cards.[14] The game cards used in the Switch are non-writable and save data is stored in the console's internal memory, unlike the DS and 3DS's game cards, which are writable and are able to store save data.[15]

Because of their small size, the Game Cards are coated with denatonium benzoate, a non-toxic bitterant, as a safety precaution against accidental consumption by young children.[16] Videos of users intentionally tasting the cartridges and reacting with disgust at the taste became a meme prior to the console's launch, which originated from Jeff Gerstmann's actions on a Giant Bomb webcast.[17][18]

The cartridges come in a variety of capacities: 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB, 8 GB, 16 GB and 32 GB.[19] 64 GB cartridges were planned to be introduced in the second half of 2018, but due to unspecified circumstances, Nintendo originally delayed the launch of this variant to 2019,[20] then delayed again to 2020. As planned the 64 GB cartridges released in 2020 and are made using XtraROM technology from Macronix.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^Vuijk, Rafael (11 October 2006). "First Nintendo DS cartridge information". Dark Fader (Rafael Vuijk). Retrieved 10 February 2010.
  2. ^"Nintendo: NDS Disassembly". GainGame's Blog. Archived from the original on 25 February 2010. Retrieved 10 February 2010.
  3. ^Ni no Kuni was the first DS game to use a 4-gigabit card "GoNintendo: Level 5's press conference - massive info roundup (Fantasy Life announced, Ninokuni's massive DS cart, and much more!)". Archived from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved 13 April 2010.
  4. ^Adam Riley (15 July 2007). "E3 2007 News - Archaic Sealed Heat (Nintendo DS) RPG Details". Cubed³. Retrieved 4 November 2007.
  5. ^Sara Guinness (16 June 2006). "MechAssault DS Developer Diary". IGN. Archived from the original on 25 December 2016. Retrieved 12 June 2020.
  6. ^Craig Harris (25 March 2009). "GDC 09: DSi Hybrid, Exclusive Carts Soon". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. Archived from the original on 27 March 2009. Retrieved 23 June 2010.
  7. ^"Pokewalker Operations Manual"(PDF). Nintendo. Archived(PDF) from the original on 13 March 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  8. ^"Pokemon Black 2 Instruction Booklet"(PDF). Nintendo. Archived(PDF) from the original on 17 June 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  9. ^"Pokemon Black Instruction Booklet"(PDF). Nintendo. Archived(PDF) from the original on 30 April 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  10. ^Yeung, Karlie (17 December 2010). "3DS Cartridges Could Store Up to 8GB". Nintendo World Report. Retrieved 31 January 2012.
  11. ^Pereira, Chris (21 June 2010). "A Look at the New Nintendo 3DS Game Cards". 1UP.com. UGO Entertainment. Archived from the original on 30 May 2012. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  12. ^"Nintendo 3DS Game Cards Look Like This". Siliconera. 18 June 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  13. ^"Nintendo Switch will use cartridges". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  14. ^Arnold, Cory (21 October 2016). "Nintendo Switch not compatible with physical 3DS or Wii U games". Destructoid. Retrieved 21 October 2016.
  15. ^Schreier, Jason (20 January 2017). "Nintendo Answers (And Avoids) Our Switch Questions". Kotaku. Retrieved 20 January 2017. "Nintendo Switch game cards are non-writable; game save data is stored in internal NAND memory."
  16. ^Dornbush, Johnathon (2 March 2017). "Nintendo Switch Cartridges Taste Terrible". IGN. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  17. ^"Nintendo Switch cartridges 'taste so bad'". BBC News. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  18. ^"New trend: Putting disgusting Nintendo Switch cartridges in your mouth". The Daily Dot. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  19. ^Yin-Poole, Wesley (13 March 2017). "Why Nintendo Switch games are ending up more expensive". Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  20. ^Mochizuki, Takashi (27 December 2017). "Nintendo Delays Rollout of 64-Gigabyte Switch Game Cards Until 2019". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  21. ^Rahming, A.K. (24 December 2019). "Switch game cards potentially getting a 64GB variant". Nintendo Enthusiast. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_game_card

Game cartridge ds

I obediently dropped my eyelids on the limp in the chair. For a few seconds I did not feel anything, but then I felt light, like a feather, touching my pussy. Her fingers fluttered my crotch, terribly exciting. From the beginning, realizing what she was doing, I wanted to be indignant, but it gave me unthinkable pleasure.

The nurse felt my inner struggle, and therefore began to rub the clitoris even more persistently.

Opening a 3DS and DS Game Cartridge.

A few words about our parents with Igor from a sexual point of view. It was an active couple. Judge for yourself, mom is 32, dad is 35, what else can people do at this age, if not with passion.

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You don't look like a stupid person, she said calmly. Do you think you'll walk out of this door. Come on, she waved her hand. Try.



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