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2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited: Three Wheels Across America

Can-Am SpyderBombardier Recreational Products recently loaned us two of their top-of-the-line Can-Am touring models and a trailer for an exhaustive cross-country test. 
Starting in St. Louis, MO, we followed the Lewis and Clark Trail more than 3,000 miles to Oregon’s Pacific Coast. In addition to fluctuations in weather and 
topography, we experienced a wide variety of riding 
conditions on the secondary paved roads.

They’re Not Motorcycles!
The Can-Am Spyders, with their “Y-shaped” configuration of two wheels in front and one in the back, are obviously not motorcycles. You don’t counter-steer or lean them into corners. The steering is similar to that of an ATV or a snowmobile, where the handlebar a is swung in the same direction in which the rider intends to go. Also, the hand controls are different from a traditional bike: paddle shifters on the left change gears (which means there are no clutch or gearshift levers), and all braking is accomplished with the rider’s right foot. Although the throttle is operated with the right hand like a standard cycle, it took this veteran rider several days before running the Can-Am became a second-nature process.

Performance
Although the power-to-weight ratio of the Can-Am Spyder RT doesn’t make it a road burner, the torque-happy Rotax engine has plenty of grunt. Even riding two-up and pulling a loaded trailer, it accelerates rapidly and overtakes vehicles at highway speeds. The integrated ABS braking system worked flawlessly and inspired rider confidence when bringing the heavily loaded vehicle to a quick stop. Gas mileage on the Can-Am (two-up plus loaded trailer) averaged around 28 mpg. Jeff, who rode one-up without a trailer, but fully loaded, averaged around 35 mpg.

Handling
Although the Spyders have variable ratio power steering, executing smooth lines through curves is an acquired skill. When cornering at speed, I had a strong tendency to over-steer and make multiple corrections before exiting a curve. The suspension was initially set too soft, and mid-curve steering corrections occasionally created a back-and-forth rocking motion. This further amplified the over-steering effect.

Part of the handling solution was to increase the front suspension’s pre-load one notch and crank the rear suspension pre-load up to its maximum setting. In addition, it was even more important than on a motorcycle to look completely through curves and apply a relatively light touch to the handlebars. With more practice, I became pretty proficient at executing corners. However, there was a very noticeable “cliff effect” to the speed at which a curve could be negotiated easily. I usually had to slow down a little to even out the handling again.

Traveling across the Great Plains and through the Columbia River Gorge, we encountered very strong side winds. The Spyder RTs presented a sizable target for those gales to grab onto and toss around, especially riding two-up and pulling a trailer. That effect, combined with the vehicle’s relatively sensitive steering, made riding it in excess of 65 mph a handful. The problems substantially diminished, though, as speed was reduced to the 55 to 60 mph range.

Although a large, heavy vehicle, the Spyder RT proved to be adept at negotiating small spaces. The relatively tight turning radius, level platform with three wheels, and reverse gear made parking maneuvers a snap. The only significant OMG moment was a hydroplaning incident on a rain-slicked backroad, but that handling issue was solved by a considerable decrease in speed.

Safety
The most obvious safety advantage the Spyder has over a conventional motorcycle is its three wheels, which virtually eliminate the possibility of a low side crash, a tip over, or various other challenges to keeping the rubber side down. The Can-Am’s more substantial road presence also reduces the likelihood of not being seen by other drivers. I don’t recall a single incident of another vehicle pulling into my lane or taking some other action that suggested its driver didn’t see me.

The Spyders also have several electronic systems that promote safety. Besides ABS, there is a Traction Control System (TCS), an Electro Mechanical Parking Brake, Vehicle Stability System (VSS), Digitally Encoded Security System (DESS), Dynamic Power Steering (DPS), and the Stability Control System (SCS). I inadvertently activated the SCS on a curve when the inside wheel separated slightly from a rough section of pavement. The Spyder immediately reduced speed and re-established contact between the tire and the pavement.

One downside of the three-wheel configuration is dodging road hazards that suddenly appear in your lane. Because it’s virtually 
impossible to straddle or swerve around roadkill and other objects without crossing the yellow line (on a two-lane road), riders usually have to enter the opposing lane once it is clear of oncoming traffic or use the road’s shoulder.

Comfort
The upright riding position and lower back support for the rider helped to lessen road fatigue during long hours in the saddle. To ward off cramping, I periodically stretched out my legs and rested my boots on the rubber air dams that direct engine heat out the side. I doubt those parts were intended for use as such, but they did a fine job of impersonating highway pegs. Other key features include GPS, cruise control, heated grips (for rider and passenger), passenger floorboards, 12V power outlet, and an iPhone/MP3 connection.

A firm, and sometimes jarring, ride was the tradeoff for increasing suspension pre-load. The electronically adjustable windshield, in its fully extended position, substantially reduced wind noise and helmet buffeting at highway speeds. At slower speeds, lowering it all the way down was necessary to improve rider airflow on very hot days. Overall, the windscreen and other deflectors seem designed primarily to protect riders from cold air and have limited adjustability to increase rider airflow in hot weather.

The RT-622 Trailer
Although the fiberglass trailer is a relatively light 250 pounds and aerodynamically designed, inevitably, there has to be some degrading of acceleration, handling, and stopping distance. The performance impact I experienced, though, was relatively minor considering the added hauling capacity and overall convenience the trailer provided for quickly stowing helmets and other riding gear.

Final Thoughts
Overall, the Can-Am Spyder RT Limited is both a fun and highly capable vehicle for long-distance touring. And riders get much the same open-air experience as riding a motorcycle. While it’s certainly true that Can-Am Spyders handle differently than two-wheeled motorcycles, there are clearly some unique advantages to touring on this three-wheeled vehicle. In the final analysis, it’s not a question of whether two wheels or three wheels are best, but a matter of personal preference. The Can-Am Spyder RT Limited has much to be recommended for.

Second Opinion by Jeff Arpin
The lure of riding is powerful, and satisfying that desire has given us a wealth of choices on what to ride. Can-Am has conceived and executed a new option that opens the world of cycling to a whole new segment of the population—those who may not wish, or be able, to execute the challenges that go with two wheels. The Can-Am Spyder makes for a highly able tourer that provides long distance comfort, commodious storage, plenty of power and features, and lots of operating convenience. After 24 days on board, I was never uncomfortable or fatigued, never short of a place to put something, in love with the integrated roller board luggage, impressed by the strong throttle and brakes, and appreciative of the thoughtful engineering.

If I had to pick an area that could be improved, it would be the steering. Because the Can-Am does not lean, and the front wheels remain vertical, higher speed cornering left me a bit unsure of myself. I felt that adjustment inputs were constantly needed, and when cornering aggressively, an edge that is too abrupt and sharp made for some grip grasping moments. I did get better with time, and doubtlessly would continue to do so.

Other minor tweaks I could suggest include: improve the size/visibility of some displays, enhance rider ventilation, add floorboards and highway pegs, simplify the starting/parking brake sequence, and locate the gas tank fill hole externally. Overall, the Can-Am Spyder is a very capable machine that should more than satisfy the desire to ride for many who feel the call.

Our Ten Suggestions for Making the Can-Am Spyder RTs Even Better

In summary, we believe the Spyder RTs would benefit from the following 10 enhancements:

  1. Add floor boards to improve long-distance comfort for the rider.
  2. Add highway pegs, which would allow riders to periodically stretch their legs.
  3. Allow parking brake to be set without restarting the engine (and being embarrassed by the prolonged beeping noise).
  4. Make setting pre-load adjustments on the front suspension easier.
  5. For hot weather riding, increase airflow to rider by having directionally movable air vents.
  6. Fill in space around the steering shaft, which connects to handlebars , so it’s not possible to lose keys or other small items in a hard to access location.
  7. Make dashboard icons for turn signals and other indicators larger and easier to see in bright sunlight.
  8. Relocate the gas tank filler-hole to an externally accessed location. Lifting the seat requires a passenger to dismount or is difficult if gear is stowed on the passenger seat.
  9. Because the cruising range of a Can-Am pulling a loaded trailer can become a concern in western states (where refueling stations are often farther apart), increase fuel tank capacity by one half to one full gallon.
  10.  Make engagement of Reverse an easier one-step procedure.

 

Tags:Can-Am, handling, performance, SpyderCategories:Motorcycles

Sours: https://www.roadrunner.travel/blog/2013/02/18/2012-can-am-spyder-rt-limited-three-wheels-across-america/

“Is that a motorcycle?” The woman pumping gas into a pickup truck had been staring intently at my ride, and I knew it was just a matter of time before she would ask the question. I cringed when she did. “I don’t know,” was my weary, yet honest reply. “I’m still trying to figure that out myself.” Her eyes broke from the Can-Am Spyder RT Limited I was fuelling to look me in the face. “Whadda you mean, you don’t know?”

Three-wheeled motorcycles, or trikes, are nothing new under the sun. Despite a long history that includes the Depression-era Harley-Davidson ServiCar, homebuilt VW-powered customs, and thoroughly modern Lehmans, the trike remains an often maligned and misunderstood segment of the motorcycle landscape. Compounding the confusion surrounding the use of an extra wheel was the introduction of the Can-Am Spyder, which eschewed tradition by placing its dual wheels at the front of the machine. The Spyder, too, has taken its fair share of knocks from the purists, who like to describe it derisively as a snowmobile with wheels. Regardless of opinion, should trikes – and the Spyder – be considered subtypes of motorcycles?

Test Driving the Can-Am Spyder RT LimitedThis would have to be settled by subjecting a Spyder to a Mojo road test. Our request for a Spyder RT from BRP, the Canadian manufacturer of Can-Am, produced a top-of-the-line RT Limited, delivered to our closest Can-Am dealer, St. Onge Recreation. Many features of the touring-grade Spyder RT differentiate it from the Spyder RS and RS-S models. Available in four levels of trim, an RT is most easily identified by the addition of panniers and a top box to its profile. Also common to every RT is an electrically articulated windshield, cruise control, and heated grips. Moving upscale in the model range, the RT Audio & Convenience adds an iPod-compatible sound system, additional instrumentation and heated pillion grab handles. The even higher-spec RT-S includes an electronically adjustable rear suspension, rear speakers for the sound system, fog lights, LED running lights and chrome trim work.

Compartment storage of the Can-Am Spyder RoadsterStealing the show is the RT Limited, with a grandiose list of features that scream that it’s a premium machine. For hardcore travellers, there’s a Bluetooth-ready Garmin Zumo GPS integrated into the RT’s electronics system and a custom-fitted travel bag inside each of the four storage compartments. The front storage bag doubles as a carry-on bag for air travel, with roller wheels and an extendable tow handle. An included travel cover shelters the machine when parked. More for show, the Limited’s mirrors, exhaust tip, heat shield, and six-spoke wheels have all been chromed, and there’s a specially embroidered seat to prove that you went all the way when it came to buying a Spyder.

Just sitting on the RT demonstrated another significant difference from an RS model: the riding position is far more upright and relaxed. With a more protective fairing, there’s no need to tilt into the wind on an RT like you do on an RS. Comfort proved to be exemplary, and even when loaded with two six-footers, there was plenty of room aboard the RT. The only surprise with its layout was the use of “pegs instead of footboards for the rider’s feet. The pillion position, on the other hand, is served by height-adjustable, folding floorboards.
The early winter conditions during the test had me questioning what I was still doing, riding so late in the year, but at least the sometimes frigid weather did provide a proving ground for the RT’s wind protection and heated handlebar grips. The grips can be set to either high or low. High provided plenty of heat even through the thick gloves I was wearing, and low worked well to maintain warmth. Slightly odd was the heated pillion grab handles; with an ample backrest and a supportive seat for the passenger, it’s unlikely that the grab handles will see a lot of use. A heated seat would have been a bonus for the rider, and made more sense than heated grips for a passenger.

I’m a big fan of electrically adjustable windshields and made good use of the one on the RT, moving it up during highway runs and down for around town. Being able to adjust it in small increments meant that I was always able to calm the airflow around me.

The RT’s dot-matrix instrument panel, updated for 2012 to improve its clarity, is controlled via the Roadster Electronic Command Center (RECC) mounted on the left handlebar. The multitasking display seemingly conveys every imaginable piece of information, including engine hour meters, a function I normally would have associated with Can-Am’s range of Sea-Doo watercraft.

It took minimal trial and error to figure out how to use the RECC and the myriad displays and options it controls. That I was able to intuitively figure out the in-depth electronic system without referring to a manual indicates the soundness of its design. My only complaint was with the RECC’s buttons, which were difficult to use while wearing thick, cold-weather gloves. Some menu items, such as time setting, were only accessible while the RT was stopped; undoubtedly, BRP’s legal department was concerned with the safety of riders distracted by the instrumentation. A more obvious example of BRP liability concerns is that the RT can’t be started until a rider presses its Mode button first, a procedure that acts as confirmation that the vehicle’s safety information has been read.

For a touring rider, 155 litres of stowage space will be the main argument for buying an RT. Although its matching luggage set is handy for toting everything into a hotel room during a trip, I found the front storage compartment most handy for day-to-day use. It can be unlocked by pushing a toggle switch and was big enough to swallow all of my riding gear, including a full-face helmet. The cubby bin located at the rider’s crotch is ideally suited for small items such as a wallet and cell phone, but I found the lid unlatched too easily, and opted instead to keep those items in my
jacket pockets.

Powering every Spyder is a proven, 998 cc Rotax V-twin, which for the RT has been recalibrated for touring duty by placing greater emphasis on torque (80 ft-lb) to handle the additional weight of a passenger and fully loaded cargo holds. On paper, the claimed 100 hp engine output seems underwhelming, especially for a machine the size and weight of a Spyder. In reality, I was surprised that it provided decent performance, and I had no qualms with the RT’s power; even though the engine obviously had to move a fair amount of weight, the RT accelerated hard enough to satisfy the needs of a touring rig.

A traditional 5-speed gearbox with reverse and a manual clutch is standard for every Spyder. The Limited on our test came with the optional semi-automatic system, which meant shifting was performed via two paddle-type buttons at the left handgrip. The system downshifts automatically if you forget to do so when slowing, but won’t upshift on its own. Gear changes made while remaining on the throttle were abrupt enough that I realized the semi-auto should be shifted like a standard transmission; rolling off the throttle whenever I tapped the shift button resulted in a seamless gear change every time. The reverse gear, essential on a three-wheeler, was easy to use. However, because it requires pushing two buttons simultaneously to engage, it can be a two-handed operation if you have smaller hands.

The RT uses a final belt drive, ideal for a touring-oriented machine. The setup, which requires less maintenance than a chain and weighs less than a shaft, was both smooth and quiet as it transferred power to the rear wheel.

Riding a Spyder is an experience like no other. Although there are similarities to traditional trikes, its handling through turns is very different. It’s a relaxing and easy machine to navigate when loping along at posted speed limits. But push the pace on a twisting road with the intent of stuffing it into a turn with gusto, and you’d better be hanging on – hard – not just with your hands, but with your legs as well. Riding a Spyder hard is not an easy proposition, but it is physically engaging and fun. Unlike motorcycles that lean in turns, three-wheelers track through them relatively level, and the resulting forces want to throw the rider off the machine toward the outside of the turn. Anyone familiar with snowmobiles will instantly compensate by riding with their bodies hanging off the machine toward the inside of each turn.

Unlike conventional trikes, the Spyder offers far more grip from its front end. Enter a turn too fast on other trikes, and the front wheel will literally be plowed sideways as the machine runs wide. With two front wheels, the Spyder has a lot more traction to turn harder, and the tires will howl in protest before they give up traction.

Underpinning the Spyder, and well hidden by its abundant bodywork, is a Surrounding Spar Technology (SST) frame, a proven design from BRP’s Can-Am ATV department, which is claimed to minimize weight and provide a lower centre of gravity. The RT’s chassis differs slightly from the RS by virtue of its wider track, no doubt a necessity considering its additional 104 kg weight and requirement to carry greater loads.

There’s no question that the RT provided a luxurious ride, in part because the rear shock’s pneumatically adjustable preload could be electronically controlled on the fly. A console-mounted toggle switch allows for incremental adjustments between hard and soft; although there was an appreciable difference between the two extremes, it would have been even better had it controlled all three of the RT’s shocks. There are also preset suspension settings accessible by the RECC based on whether or not you’re towing a trailer. Yes, Can-Am does sell a $4,999, colour-matched trailer for the Spyder, which provides an additional 622 litres of storage.

The front suspension consists of a double-A arm and a single shock at each wheel, which can be manually adjusted for preload. Despite the assistance of an anti-roll bar, the RT’s front end still exhibited considerable roll and would squat on its outside wheel when pushed hard through a tight turn. Despite the stresses placed on the chassis during demanding manoeuvring, the steering remained light at all times, a function of the RT’s Dynamic Power Steering (DPS), which electronically regulates varying levels of steering assist based on speed, steering angle and acceleration.

I’ve heard many complaints from those who don’t own a Spyder that the intervention of its sophisticated Vehicle Stability System (VSS) neuters the fun you can have on the machine. It’s nonsense. In truth, there’s no way that the Spyder would have passed safety testing without VSS in place; those complainers would likely be the first to lose control and ride the machine off a cliff without the VSS’s assistance.

Developed in cooperation with Bosch, the automotive-like VSS package combines the Spyder’s stability and traction controls with its ABS system to keep the machine from stepping out at the wrong time. The stability control system monitors the handlebar and throttle positions and compares intended direction with actual direction, reducing engine speed and/or individually applying brakes to a wheel to correct the course. Similarly, traction control senses rear-wheel rotation and will reduce the engine’s power output when it loses grip. Figuring out the parameters of VSS was entertaining, and I was surprised by some of the hooligan activity it permitted, like being able to hoist a front wheel through a turn.

Two features of the Spyder most likely to momentarily trip up long-time motorcyclists are its parking brake and lack of a front brake lever. Setting the parking brake on the RT through a console rocker switch was an easy task compared to the manual foot lever used on an RS. Equally strange for a motorcyclist is that braking for all wheels is performed with just a foot lever, as you would in a car. The brake system is linked, but is biased toward the front wheels. Backed by ABS, the brakes performed well, but lacked the feedback and ferocity of a high-performance system.

It’s unfortunate that some hold a very narrow view of what qualifies as a motorcycle and are quick to dismiss three-wheelers such as the Spyder, often for no other reason than it doesn’t lean. It’s a weak argument, because the Spyder embodies so many of the qualities that motorcyclists value highly, like the thrill of moving at speed fully exposed to the elements, and the sense of adventure that each ride provides. And for motorcyclists no longer able or willing to balance a heavy tourer, the Spyder RT represents a viable option to keep them riding and enjoying life on the open road.

There is no denying that the Spyder RT is brilliant at its intended purpose, to be an entertaining and innovative way to travel and experience the world. It’s built to a high standard with a particularly strong attention to detail, so the RT Limited isn’t cheap, but it is competitively priced when compared to luxury touring motorcycles.

After a lot of saddle time and a bit of internal debate, I now realize that I should have said yes to the woman at the gas station. The Spyder deserves to be called a motorcycle – even if it’s a three-wheeled version of one.
 

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited Spec Chart

MODEL2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
List Price$30,399 ($31,999 as tested)
Fitted Optional EquipmentSE5 semi-automatic transmission ($1,600)
Warranty2 years
Engine TypeLiquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve, V-twin
Displacement998 cc
Power (claimed)71 kW (100 hp) at 7500 rpm
Torque (claimed)108 N-m (80 ft-lb) at 5000 rpm
Bore and Stroke97 x 68 mm
Compression Ratio10.8:1
Fuel DeliveryEFI with 51 mm throttle body
Transmission5-speed semi-automatic with reverse
Final Drive TypeBelt
Front SuspensionTwo double-A arms, each with a single preload adjustable shock; one anti-roll bar
Rear SuspensionSingle shock with electronic control of the pneumatically adjustable preload
Wheel Travel151 mm (5.9 in.) front; 145 mm (5.7 in.) rear
BrakesFront: two 250 mm discs with four-piston calipersRear: one 250 mm disc with single-piston caliper
Wheelbase1708 mm (67.2 in.)
TiresTwo 165/65-14 front; one 225/50-15 rear
Weight (dry)421 kg (929 lb.)
Seat Height772 mm (30.4 in.)
Fuel Capacity25 L
Fuel Economy (observed)6.8 L/100 km (42 mpg)
Fuel Range (estimated)368 km
BUY THIS ISSUESours: https://motorcyclemojo.com/2012/03/can-am-spyder-rt-limited/
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2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited
2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

– 2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited Review

Luxury.

When it’s time to go all out, it’s time for the 2012 Spyder RT Limited. This luxury version of our three-wheeled roadster comes equipped with a Vehicle Stability System, cruiser control and semi-automatic transmission, along with a host of technology upgrades and added convenience features. On this ride, the only thing optional is returning home.

When it’s time to go all out, it’s time for the Spyder RT Limited. This luxury version of our three-wheeled roadster comes equipped with a Vehicle Stability System, cruise control and semi-automatic transmission, along with a host of technology upgrades and added convenience features. There are also two exclusive color options and chrome accents. On this ride, the only thing optional is returning home.

BRP has traditionally and successfully launched luxurious “limited” models in many segments of the powersports market. For 2012, the Spyder RT Limited roadster is even more magnificent with its new exclusive upgrades. The Spyder RT Limited starts with a Spyder RT-S platform and improves upon it with an integrated GPS system, two exclusive colors, four travel bags, travel cover, chrome accents and a specially embroidered seat. However, with its Rotax V-Twin engine, proprietary SST chassis, precision handling and unmatched comfort, the Spyder RT Limited roadster is much more than just an elegant façade.

Three wheels. Endless possibilities.

The Can-Am roadster’s distinctive Y-shaped footprint certainly catches the eye. But its trademark stance also provides stability and control, inspiring a whole new kind of ride. Accelerate with authority. Corner with confidence. Reinvent your ride.

Technologies like a car. That’s where the similarities end. Anti-lock brakes. Stability control system. Cruise control. A clutchless
semi-automatic transmission. When you incorporate these familiar technologies into a vehicle that is like nothing else on the road, everything changes. In the case of the Can-Am roadster, the result is an open-air riding experience that is instantly accessible and exponentially exhilarating.

A Movement of Thousands.

Whether it’s on the touring-ready Spyder® RT or the sporty Spyder RS, hitting the open road is easier and more exciting than ever. It’s why thousands of riders have already discovered the Can-Am roadster. Ride solo. With a partner. Or together with other riders.

Get your lice nse on a Can-Am roadster .

In most states and provinces, you can use your Can-Am roadster to pass a road test and get your riding endorsement quickly. You’ll see you have every reason to get behind the wheels. Brought to you by BRP. A trusted name in adventure. For over 60 years, we have brought cutting-edge design and technology to the powersports world. From Ski-Doo snowmobiles to Sea-Doo watercraft and boats, to Can-Am ATVs and side-by-sides, to Evinrudeoutboards and more.

The Can-Am roadster delivers the same level of performance, innovation and excitement as its predecessors.

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited Key Features

Added Features over Spyder RT -S

– Handlebar-mounted Garmin Zumo 660 color touchscreen GPS, integrated into vehicle electronics system and Bluetooth
– New aluminum six-spoke chrome wheels
– New chrome accents: Mirrors, exhaust tip and heat shield
– 4 Semi-rigid travel bags for side, front and rear cargo compartments
– Pearl White color (returns for 2012) with black embroidered seat
– New Lava Bronze Metallic color with new tan embroidered seat
– Travel cover

What’s new for 2012?

– New amber-colored multi-function Dot-matrix display
– New Lava Bronze Metallic color scheme with embroidered Tan seat
– New aluminum six-spoke chrome front wheels
– New chrome accents: mirrors, heat shield and exhaust tip

Dot-matrix Display:

– New amber multi-function Dot-matrix display coloration for improved contrast at night

Available colors:

– Pearl White with black seat color (incl. passenger backrest and driver lumbar rest support)
– New Lava Bronze Metallic with new tan seat color (incl. passenger backrest and driver lumbar rest support)

2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited Features and Benefits

– 998cc Rotax V-Twin engine calibrated for touring

– 41 US Gal. (155L) of storage

– Vehicle Stability System

– Adjustable electronic windshield

– Multi-function dot-matrix color gauge

– Digitally Encoded Security System (D.E.S.S.)

– Heated rider grips

– Cruise Control

– Ultra comfort saddle with lumbar support and integrated passenger backrest

– Chrome wheels /trims – Give your Spyder RT Limited a unique, upscale look with chrome wheels, exhaust tip, heat shield and mirrors.

– Limited -Edition Seat and Color S – Exclusive colors with embroidered seats add an extra touch of class and refinement.

– Travel Cover – A practical, fitted cover to protect your Spyder RT Limited during those rare times it’s not in use.

– Semi -Rigid Travel Bags – Four removable travel bags are a perfect fit for your belongings. And they’re easy to carry once you reach your destination.

– GPS – Integrated Garmin Zumo‡ 660 GPS. Easy-read, 4.3″ touch screen and Bluetooth‡ wireless technology.

– Handlebar-mounted Garmin Zumo 660 color touchscreen GPS, integrated into vehicle electronics system and Bluetooth

– New aluminum six-spoke chrome wheels

– New chrome accents: Mirrors, exhaust tip and heat shield

– 4 Semi-rigid travel bags for side, front and rear cargo compartments

– Pearl White color (returns for 2012) with black embroidered seat

– New Lava Bronze Metallic color with new tan embroidered seat

– Travel cover

ULTRA COMFORT TOURING SADDLE
Premium saddle featuring passenger backrest and driver lumbar support for maximum comfort during extended journeys.

Entertainment System
AM/FM audio system with iPod compatibility, weather band and optional satellite radio.

Heated Handgri ps
Thermal grips for the rider are standard on all Spyder RT models. Heated passenger handgrips also available.*

155 Liters (41 gal .) of Cargo Space
Lockable, watertight front storage with 44 liters (12 gal.) of space plus two side compartments, one rear and a glove box.

Electric Windshield
Adjustable-on-the-fly windshield for comfort whether it’s a hot or cool day.

Vehicle Stability System

The Y™ architecture of the Can-Am roadster allows it to host an innovative and unique stability system. Developed in partnership
with BOSCH† and inspired by automotive technologies, the system integrates ABS, traction control and stability control functions for an incredibly confident ride.

STABILITY CONTROL SYSTEM
The stability control assesses your intended direction via the handlebar and determines the vehicle’s appropriate response. The system individually brakes the wheels and/or reduces excess engine torque until control is regained.

ANTI-LOCK BRAKING SYSTEM
Sensors monitor the rotation of all three wheels. If any of the wheels is at risk of locking, ABS reduces brake pressure on it. This intervention repeats in rapid succession and can be performed independently on each wheel, allowing for maximum braking performance.

TRACTION CONTROL SYSTEM
Whenever the Traction Control System detects excessive rear wheel spin (e.g., in slippery conditions), it reduces engine torque by regulating engine ignition and fuel injection. This enables the roadster to accelerate with minimal corrective input from the rider.

DYNAMIC POWER STEERING
The electronically controlled power steering system provides the rider with a varying assist when turning the handlebars. The amount of assistance varies with the speed of the vehicle to adjust the steering input effort to a comfortable level.

Transmission Options

SEMI-AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
No clutch lever. No foot shifter. The Can-Am roadster’s semi-automatic 5-speed transmission uses convenient paddle shifting, a feature typically associated with sports cars. The paddle shift makes for faster, smoother shifting, which means you can get the adrenaline pumping as quickly as you please. Simply apply pressure with your left thumb to shift up and use your forefinger to downshift. It also features reverse for increased maneuverability.

MANUAL TRANSMISSION
Fluid motion stems from the smooth, 5-speed gearbox created specifically for the Can-Am roadster. It also features reverse for increased maneuverability.

Optimum Security

The Digitally Encoded Security System (D.E.S.S.™) helps protect the Can-Am roadster from theft or other unauthorized use. The vehicle will not start unless the rider uses the correctly coded electronic key.


Proven Rotax Engine

998cc V-twin Rotax engine – Over the past 50 years, more than 6 million Rotax® engines have been built, powering the world’s most impressive on- and off-road machines. Every Can-Am roadster is equipped with a 998cc V-Twin Rotax engine calibrated for sport or touring riding. Touring engines offer cruise control and electronic throttle control.


2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited – USA Specifications/Technical Details
US MSRP Price:
$28,899 USD

ENGINE
Manufacturer BRP-Rotax®
Type 998cc Rotax V-twin engine calibrated for touring
Bore & stroke 3.82 in. x 2.68 in. (97 mm x 68 mm)
Injection Multi-point EFI system with 2 in. (51 mm) throttle body
Power 100 hp (71 KW) @ 7500 RPM
Torque 80 lb.-ft. (108 Nm) @ 5000 RPM
Transmissions 5-speed manual (SM5) with reverse
Magneto 650 watts
Starter Electric
Battery 12 volts / 21 amps/hour, sealed maintenance-free

CHASSIS
Frame SST Spyder
Front suspension Double A-arm with anti-roll bar
Front suspension travel 5.9 in. (151 mm)
Rear suspension Swing-arm with pneumatic adjustable preload
Rear suspension travel 5.7 in. (145 mm)
Brake type Foot-activated, hydraulic 3-wheel braking system
Front brakes 4-piston calipers with (250 mm x 6 mm) discs
Rear brake Single-piston sliding pins caliper with (250 mm x 6 mm) disc
EBD Electronic Brake Distribution
Parking brake Electro-mechanical
Front tires 165 / 65 R14
Rear tire 225 / 50 R15
Front wheels 6-spoke Aluminum Metallic Silver 14 x 5 in. (355 mm x 127 mm)
Rear wheel Aluminum Metallic Silver 15 x 7 in. (381 mm x 178 mm)

SAFETY & SECURITY
VSS Vehicle Stability System
SCS Stability Control System
TCS Traction Control System
ABS Anti-lock Braking System
DESS Digitally Encoded Security System
DPS Dynamic Power Steering

DIMENSIONS
L x W x H 105 x 61.9 x 58 in. (2,667 x 1,572 x 1,473 mm)
Wheelbase 67.2 in. (1,708 mm)
Seat height 30.4 in. (772 mm)
Ground clearance 4.5 in. (115 mm)
Dry weight 929 lb. (421 kg)
Total storage capacity 41 US gal. (155 L)
Maximum vehicle load 525 lb. (240 kg)
Fuel capacity 6.6 US gal. (25 L)

FEATURES
Instrumentation Multi-function color dot-matrix/analog gauge: digital speedometer,
tachometer, odometer, trip & hour meters, gear position,
temperature, engine lights, electronic fuel gauge, clock
Lighting 2 halogen headlamps (60W)
Windshield Touring: electric adjustment
Wind deflectors 2 driver wind deflectors
Cruise control Electronic
Heated grips Heated rider handlebar grips, High/Low/Off
Touring saddle Ultra comfortable with lumbar support and passenger backrest
Passenger floorboard Manually adjustable
Passenger armrests Standard on all Spyder RT models
RECC Roadster Electronic Command Center
Power outlet 12V lighter type, in rear cargo area
Trailer lock Barrel for RT-622 trailer (Trailer optional)
Warranty 2 years
Transmission available SM5 – 5-speed manual with reverse

Color
Pure Magnesium Metallic


2012 Can-Am Spyder RT Limited – Canadian Specifications/Technical Details
Canada MSRP Price:
$31,999 CDN

ENGINE
Manufacturer BRP-Rotax®
Type 998cc Rotax V-twin engine calibrated for touring
Bore & stroke 3.82 in. x 2.68 in. (97 mm x 68 mm)
Injection Multi-point EFI system with 2 in. (51 mm) throttle body
Power 100 hp (71 KW) @ 7500 RPM
Torque 80 lb.-ft. (108 Nm) @ 5000 RPM
Transmissions 5-speed manual (SM5) with reverse
Magneto 650 watts
Starter Electric
Battery 12 volts / 21 amps/hour, sealed maintenance-free

CHASSIS
Frame SST Spyder
Front suspension Double A-arm with anti-roll bar
Front suspension travel 5.9 in. (151 mm)
Rear suspension Swing-arm with pneumatic adjustable preload
Rear suspension travel 5.7 in. (145 mm)
Brake type Foot-activated, hydraulic 3-wheel braking system
Front brakes 4-piston calipers with (250 mm x 6 mm) discs
Rear brake Single-piston sliding pins caliper with (250 mm x 6 mm) disc
EBD Electronic Brake Distribution
Parking brake Electro-mechanical
Front tires 165 / 65 R14
Rear tire 225 / 50 R15
Front wheels 6-spoke Aluminum Metallic Silver 14 x 5 in. (355 mm x 127 mm)
Rear wheel Aluminum Metallic Silver 15 x 7 in. (381 mm x 178 mm)

SAFETY & SECURITY
VSS Vehicle Stability System
SCS Stability Control System
TCS Traction Control System
ABS Anti-lock Braking System
DESS Digitally Encoded Security System
DPS Dynamic Power Steering

DIMENSIONS
L x W x H 105 x 61.9 x 58 in. (2,667 x 1,572 x 1,473 mm)
Wheelbase 67.2 in. (1,708 mm)
Seat height 30.4 in. (772 mm)
Ground clearance 4.5 in. (115 mm)
Dry weight 929 lb. (421 kg)
Total storage capacity 41 US gal. (155 L)
Maximum vehicle load 525 lb. (240 kg)
Fuel capacity 6.6 US gal. (25 L)

FEATURES
Instrumentation Multi-function color dot-matrix/analog gauge: digital speedometer,
tachometer, odometer, trip & hour meters, gear position,
temperature, engine lights, electronic fuel gauge, clock
Lighting 2 halogen headlamps (60W)
Windshield Touring: electric adjustment
Wind deflectors 2 driver wind deflectors
Cruise control Electronic
Heated grips Heated rider handlebar grips, High/Low/Off
Touring saddle Ultra comfortable with lumbar support and passenger backrest
Passenger floorboard Manually adjustable
Passenger armrests Standard on all Spyder RT models
RECC Roadster Electronic Command Center
Power outlet 12V lighter type, in rear cargo area
Trailer lock Barrel for RT-622 trailer (Trailer optional)
Warranty 2 years
Transmission available SM5 – 5-speed manual with reverse

Colour
Pure Magnesium Metallic

*Price, Specifications and photos may change without notice.

Sours: https://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcycles/2012models/2012-Can-Am-SpyderRT-Limited

No, I did not rebel, and I was not ashamed of them. I was just afraid that my mom would notice my excitement when she examined me. I controlled my emotions, biting my lips so as not to moan and cum right in the examining room. After each such examination, I would lock myself in the closet and finish what my mother started by rubbing her clitoris.

Can am 2012

Her moans grew louder and longer. The situation and sensations excited more and more. Very quietly, unable to endure the slow, smooth movements in herself, Katya asked: Fuck me harder. There was a laugh from the audience, but Katya didn't. Give a damn.

S1E5: My 2012 Can-Am Spyder Review, Fantastic Bike!

Liters in the heat exchanger. Capacity for cold water, no less. And where did they spend it, frogs.

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The blood rushed into the face of the Phoenician, his eyes flashed with wild anger, his lips parted and stretched out, demonstrating. not a smile, but a predatory grin. So, without saying a word, Punna suddenly grabbed a knife from under the cloak and hit Elatius. The instantaneous reaction of the Samnite, who immediately stepped aside, saved his life, but the suddenness with which the attack was made brought the Phoenician a partial success.

The blade of a knife pierced the tunic on the gladiator's left side and split the skin.



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